The Guardian hírek

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    UK coronavirus live: scientist warns Johnson backing Cummings has 'fatally undermined' Covid-19 response

    Member of government’s behavioural science group damning on message ‘one rule rule for them and one rule for us’ sends PM’s defence of Cummings sparks anger from allies and opponents Dominic Cummings facing possible police investigation Global coronavirus updates - live See all our coronavirus coverage 8.30am BST Criticism has rained down on Boris Johnson and Dominic Cummings from the nation’s papers, some of it from unlikely quarters. While attacks from the Daily Mirror and the Guardian were to be expected, even the right-leaning Daily Mail and the Daily Telegraph were among the critics, the Mail launching a withering assault on Cummings for flouting lockdown guidelines and on Johnson for his defence of his chief adviser. “What planet are they on?” the Mail screams on its front page, saying that is the question the nation is asking about the “No 10 svengali who flouted the PM’s own strict lockdown rules”, and about Mr Johnson “brazenly” supporting him. The papers today rain down criticism on Boris Johnson and Dominic Cummings, with even the daily mail and the telegraph criticising them. Doesn’t look like this story is going away. Join me as I live blog today #coronavirus #cummings 8.22am BST A member of the government’s advisory group on behavioural science has said the “debacle” over Dominic Cummings has “fatally undermined” efforts to fight coronavirus. Prof Stephen Reicher told Good Morning Britain: If you look at the research it shows the reason why people observed lockdown was not for themselves, it wasn’t because they were personally at risk, they did it for the community, they did it because of a sense of ‘we’re all in this together’. If you give the impression there’s one rule for them and one rule for us you fatally undermine that sense of ‘we’re all in this together’ and you undermine adherence to the forms of behaviour which have got us through this crisis. Continue reading...

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    From Germany to Detroit and back: how Kraftwerk forged an industrial exchange

    Kraftwerk’s robotic rhythms resonated loudest in deindustrialising 1970s Detroit and gave rise to techno – starting a cultural feedback loop that continues today When the death of Kraftwerk co-founder Florian Schneider was announced last week, the loudest tributes came from the electronic music community. Kraftwerk’s pioneering approach, using synthesisers and sequenced drum arrangements to evoke robotic or industrial rhythms, became the blueprint for Detroit musicians such as Juan Atkins, who coined the term “techno”. Forty years later, an array of electronic genres have been created from that blueprint: Schneider and Kraftwerk created a feedback loop between Germany and Detroit that has existed for more than half a century. When Schneider and Ralf Hütter started Kraftwerk in 1970, their influences included several Detroit-based acts including the Stooges, MC5 and, according to later member Karl Bartos, Berry Gordy’s Motown label. Gordy initially worked for the Ford motor plant, and gave Motown an industrialised music production-line inspired by Detroit’s automotive industry. This was the ice-breaker in the conversation between his city and Germany – Kraftwerk’s automated drums, vocoder refrains and future-facing outlook also stemmed from the conveyor belts, piston-driven machinery and monotonous rhythm of factory life. This inescapable repetition of sound and movement – programmed, precise – was present in Detroit and Dusseldorf, both industrial centres. Continue reading...

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    India resumes domestic flights amid confusion over Covid-19 rules

    Individual states apply varying coronavirus restrictions – from 14-day quarantine to case-by-case assessment of symptoms Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage India has restarted domestic air travel as the country recorded its highest daily total of 7,000 new infections. The return of plane travel after a two-month absence came amid opposition from some states and confusion about what quarantine measures would meet passengers on arrival. Passengers travelling on Monday could only board flight if they had no symptoms, were registered on the government’s Covid-19 app, and had checked in online. They were ordered to avoid eating on flights and air crewwore protective gowns, masks, and face shields. Continue reading...

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    'Transcendentally boring': the joy of job simulation games

    From farming to trucking to bus driving, why do millions play games that replicate regular jobs in forensic detail? There is no escape for me this time. The rear axle of my pick-up truck is wedged on a boulder protruding from the mud in the middle of a deserted backwater road in Michigan. I’ve tried to attach a winch to a nearby tree to pull myself out, but it’s not working. I will have to abandon the vehicle, fit up another and try again. This load of timber is not going to deliver itself. I am playing Snowrunner, the latest in a series of painstakingly authentic offroad delivery simulator games in which players have to haul goods through a variety of unforgiving landscapes at speeds that would shame a garden snail. Before each trip you have to select exactly the right vehicle for the job, fit the correct tyres and work out your likely fuel consumption to the nearest millilitre. On the frozen roads of northern Alaska, there is no room for shoddy planning. Continue reading...

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    Getting girls active is key to future of women's sport, say coaches | Sean Ingle

    Athletes and administrators warn that gains at the top will be lost if attention is not paid to the grassroots Getting more girls and young women active must be a central part of the jigsaw if women’s sport is to continue to grow and thrive, according to players, coaches and administrators. Sport England says just 43% of girls have the recommended 30 minutes of activity a day, compared with more than half of boys. It has also found a positive association between being active and happiness and individual development. Continue reading...

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    I thought I was too different to see myself in a novel – but Sayaka Murata got me | Naoise Dolan

    Reading Convenience Store Woman helped me to have confidence in myself as an autistic writer Naoise Dolan is the author of Exciting Times Two years ago in Dublin, I read the English translation of Sayaka Murata’s 2016 novel Convenience Store Woman. The first paragraph described a Japanese supermarket’s cacophony – tinkling door chime, voices, scanner beeps. I’d been to Tokyo and loved those sounds; and there it was, that embrace. I kept reading, and kept seeing myself in the narrator. All her life, Japanese convenience store worker Keiko Furukura has had to teach herself how to behave around others. She’s relieved when her head office trainer guides her: “It was the first time anyone had ever taught me how to accomplish a normal facial expression and manner of speech.” She pretends to share co-workers’ petty irritations, and is serenely oblivious to gossip. When patronised, she only really cares about the logic: yes, yes, that was rude, but was it well argued? I’m autistic, and this is all very me. Continue reading...

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    George Kruis to leave Saracens for Japan's Panasonic Wild Knights

    Second row signs for a year with option of another Kruis still keen to represent Lions and England again George Kruis will end his 11-year association with Saracens in November and move to Japan after signing for Panasonic Wild Knights, but the Lions second-row still hopes to add to his 45 England caps. With Saracens dropping into the Championship as punishment for repeated breaches of the Premiership’s salary cap regulations, Kruis decided it was the right time to make a move he had been mulling over for two years. By basing himself abroad he will not be able to play for England unless an exceptional circumstance arises. Continue reading...

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    The pandemic has laid bare the failings of Britain's centralised state | John Harris

    Councils have been kept in the dark and starved of funds as coronavirus has spread. Power must be dispersed See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus – latest updates And so it is that we reach a watershed point in the government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis, manifested in a tangle of stories all unified by vivid themes: power concentrated at the centre, a lack of meaningful checks and balances, and the exposure by incompetence and arrogance of the mess beneath. Primary schools are meant to partly reopen next Monday, but many are in no position to do so; a test-and-tracing regime that should have materialised weeks ago is still frantically being assembled. And then along come the revelations of Dominic Cummings’s wanderings – ostensibly a tale of one man’s self-importance, but really the story of an unelected courtier whose influence and reputation speak volumes about how broken our system of government now is. One recurrent spectacle has defined the last couple of months: ministers, presumably egged on by their advisers, grandly issuing their edicts, only for people to insist that they simply do not match the reality on the ground. The schools story is one example; another was the shambolic and arrogant way that Boris Johnson announced the shift from “stay at home” to “stay alert”, and his call for droves of people to return to work. Watching the leaders of Wales and Scotland insist they had no input into the government’s change of message and then stick to their existing lockdowns was a stark reminder that the UK is continuing to fragment. In England, meanwhile, the council leaders and mayors who were suddenly faced with huge consequences for transport and public health had been caught on the hop. “No one in government thought it important to tell the cities who’d have to cope,” said the Greater Manchester mayor, Andy Burnham. Nick Forbes, the leader of Newcastle city council, told me last week: “The first I knew about it was when I saw it on TV.” Continue reading...

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    My favourite film aged 12: Diva

    The stylish French thriller was less of an art film than it looked, but I was hooked by its mix of operatic Parisian settings, elegant menace and moped daredevilry Read all the other My favourite film choices The best arts and entertainment during self-isolation For this 12-year-old, Paris was a dream city where a dream me might idle days away at pavement cafes, talking about art that was very probably profound, finding out about girls and smoking hundreds of cigarettes. So seeing Diva when it arrived at our local rep cinema was perfect screen reverie. Its hero is the moon-faced young postman Jules (Frédéric Andréi), scooting around the arrondissements on a Mobylette while nursing a romantic obsession with the opera singer Cynthia Hawkins (Wilhelmenia Wiggins Fernandez), who is world famous for forbidding any recordings. (He doesn’t deliver much post, and how she pulled her stardom off without putting out any records remains mysterious.) Continue reading...

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    ‘Turn back this wave of hate’: 100 writers call for an end to anti-Asian hostility

    Reports of hate crimes and violence against the Asian and Asian American community have surged since early in the pandemic Coronavirus – latest US updates Coronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 100 prominent writers, including several top Asian American authors, have called for an end to a surge in anti-Asian hostility in the US which they say has been “egged on” during the pandemic by the Trump administration’s pandering to racist tropes. The joint statement, co-ordinated by Pen America and the Asian American Writers’ Workshop (AAWW), comes at a time when hate crimes, violence and other attacks against Asians and Asian Americans are on the rise in the US. There have been numerous reports since early in the pandemic of Asian Americans being blamed for “bringing the virus” into the country and being told “go back to China”. Continue reading...

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    Kneel before the bus! Soviet roadside wonders – in pictures

    From tractors on columns to pavements that take off, French photographer Jason Guilbeau outsmarted lockdown to find the former USSR’s strangest street relics There’s a jet fighter on the pavement: the story behind Russia’s roadside wonders Continue reading...

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    Tree of the week: 'This fallen elm looks like a Man Ray nude'

    In this weekly series, readers tell us about their favourite trees. This week: an elm tree on Hampstead Heath in London Photographer Sandrine Joseph fell in love with this fallen elm tree on one of her daily walks around Hampstead Heath in north London. She was captivated by how much it looks like the figure of a woman. “It was winter when I took the picture. The light was perfect, there was no one around and I didn’t have to shoot many pictures to get the perfect shot,” she says. “The tree is dead but at the same time it feels timeless. It makes me think of petrified wood.” She decided to name the photo Lying because “it looks like a woman’s body lying and at the same time it is a lie”. Sandrine, 53, passes the tree roughly once a week depending on the route she takes through the heath. She often sees people sitting on it or walking or jogging past the tree without paying it any attention. She would love it if visitors would walk through the heath as if they were at an exhibition or a gallery. “The tree is an amazing sculpture created by nature, which reminded me of Man Ray’s reclining model in Primat de la Matière sur la Pensée. There’s a melancholy about it, like an ancient statue forgotten in the middle of the woods.” Continue reading...

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    There's a fighter jet on the pavement! Wonders of the Soviet roadside revolution

    From tractors on poles to a fighter jet taking off, Russia’s roadsides are still dotted with celebrations of Soviet vehicular prowess. And now a French photographer has captured their strange allure A ship teeters on the crest of a concrete wave in the Russian port city of Novorossiysk, its anti-aircraft guns pointing to the sky. One thousand kilometres away, outside Bohodukhiv in Ukraine, a tank stands on a cantilevered roadside plinth, looking as if it’s about to be fired off a diving board. Meanwhile, on the Baltic coast of Kaliningrad, a crumbling mermaid with a faded smile hovers above a swirling expressionist sign welcoming people to the seaside town of Yantarny. These are just some of the curious fragments gathered from the farthest-flung corners of the former USSR, brought together in a new book, Soviet Signs and Street Relics. It is the latest volume from Fuel – publishers of such classics as Soviet Bus Stops and Russian Criminal Tattoos – and it’s a fitting travelogue for our constrained times. Unlike these previous surveys of communist relics, photographed in the flesh, these have been collected via Google Street View. Continue reading...

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    Chart toppers: the best books to help you understand numbers

    From the classic How to Lie With Statistics to the highly relevant The Rules of Contagion ... mathematician Hannah Fry picks books to help demystify Covid-19 data It’s hard to imagine a moment in history more driven by numbers. Suddenly we’re all poring over reams of data, while debates over the merits of mathematical models are front page news. But while some are flexing new-found expertise in logarithmic axes and inflection points, those of us who have been in the game a bit longer flinch at this new epidemic of brash certainty. We know the traps that are easy to fall into when you let numbers be your guide. One graph that made me roll my eyes compared per capita death rates for the UK, the EU, China and the US. (Why lump all EU countries together? Are comparisons between the UK and China, with 20 times its population, useful?) This is an old trick – divide anything by hundreds of millions and it’s going to skew the picture, but anyone who has read Darrell Huff’s 1954 classic, How to Lie With Statistics, will know to be wary of statistical sleight of hand. Continue reading...

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    Help! I think I'm falling in love over Zoom

    I vowed to spend the coronavirus quarantine focused on looking inward. Then I went on one virtual date and everything changed Lying comfortably on her back, Allie looks up into my eyes and graces me with another one of the big smiles that I’ve quickly grown to cherish since matching with her on the dating app Hinge last week. It’s our third date. The first two went exceedingly well, with seamless conversation uncovering like-minded worldviews, agreeable senses of humor, and even some respective vulnerabilities. By this point, as the third-date rule dictates, getting a little randy was natural. “I was wondering how long it was going to take me to get you into bed,” I say, sparking a laugh, considering our current circumstances. Continue reading...

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    Shopping habits of generation Z could spell the end of fast fashion

    Research shows consumers are following younger generation’s lead in move towards sustainable fashion With the high street and the fashion industry brought to its knees by the coronavirus pandemic, the ‘buy less, buy better’ ideology of generation Z – those aged 18 to 24 – could see the beginning of the end of fast fashion, new research suggests. If generation Z’s habits are adopted by the population as a whole there could be a shift to consumers with a “divided wardrobe” – featuring rented items and others bought from resale vendors – becoming the new normal. Continue reading...

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    James Graham on This House: 'I'm writing a sort-of sequel – with an unlikely hero'

    As his parliamentary epic is streamed for National Theatre at Home, the playwright discusses politics of the past and present – and the future of theatre The best theatre and dance to watch online The best arts and entertainment during self-isolation This House is set in the parliamentary whips’ office of the 1970s. What level of access did you get to the world of whips?As a twenty-something, I knocked on Nicholas Hytner’s door and said: “I know I’m young but can I do this play?” I hadn’t done any research and I didn’t know all the elements of the story at the point he said yes. I was aware that whips traditionally operate with a complete code of silence. The whips’ office is a sealed-off world, which is why it was so exciting, but I also knew that if they didn’t talk to me there would be no play. Related: This House five-star review – James Graham's thrilling political play returns Continue reading...

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    Courtney Love in Liverpool: how Scousers taught the wild child how to rock

    In 1982, a tearaway called Courtney Love blazed into the city, intoxicated by its exploding post-punk scene. We reveal the feuds, filched raincoats and grotty flats that set her on the path to stardom If you were in Liverpool in 1982 and had a habit of wandering down Mathew Street, perhaps on your way to Probe record store, you are likely to have seen Courtney Love. She was 17 and living in the city, having been invited there by Teardrop Explodes frontman Julian Cope. Probe was one of her favourite places to go – if not to buy records, then to sit outside on the steps, drinking cider with her friend from back home in America, Robin Barbur. A hundred yards from Probe was the site of Eric’s. From 1976 to 1980, Eric’s had hosted everyone from the Ramones to Joy Division. One band formed by the venue’s regulars was Big in Japan with lineups including Jayne Casey (later of Pink Military), Bill Drummond (later of the KLF), Holly Johnson (later of Frankie Goes to Hollywood) and Ian Broudie (later of the Lightning Seeds). “We were the most damaged children society turned out that year!” recalls Casey. “And we just happened to be on stage together.” Continue reading...

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    Sandi Toksvig: 'I came out, and the tabloid press thought I was Cruella de Vil'

    Now a national treasure, the comedian and presenter was once vilified for being gay. She talks about those dark days, the lighter side of lockdown and why Bake Off was just another gig Sandi Toksvig has always been a huge “darling”-er. “Darling”, she would declaim when presenting the News Quiz on Radio 4 or QI on BBC Two; it was never completely plain to me whether she was being affectionate or ironic. It depended on the context, I suppose; on Bake Off, which is a kind of crucible for affection, it always sounded much warmer than it did on the radio. I have thought about this, on and off, for many years, but nothing prepared me for the experience of being called “darling” myself: a billionaire who had hired Beyoncé to sing Happy Birthday to them could not have felt more puffed up with pleasure. “Darling,” she starts, over Zoom of course, from what I take to be a stylish, tongue-and-groove shed in her south London back garden, “I miss restaurants. I want some really, really unctuous service.” Over the course of our conversation, she takes me on a whistle-stop tour of her regular social life, her drink of choice (bourbon), the bars where she’d prefer a martini and why she doesn’t have an American accent, even though that’s where she grew up. It is all peppered with the tantalising promise of imminent firm friendship. Continue reading...

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    Coronavirus: at a glance

    A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading...

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    Global report: US suspends travel from Brazil as schools reopen in parts of Australia

    Chile’s president says hospitals are ‘very close to limit’, France records lowest number of daily Covid-19 cases since March, India restarts domestic flights Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage President Donald Trump has further limited travel to the US from the world’s coronavirus hotspots by denying entry to foreigners coming from Brazil, which is second to the US in the number of confirmed cases. Trump had already banned certain travellers from China, Europe, the United Kingdom and Ireland and, to a lesser extent, Iran. He has not moved to ban travel from Russia, which has the world’s third-highest caseload, approximately 20,000 fewer than Brazil’s. Continue reading...

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    Myanmar army accused of new atrocities in attack on Rakhine village

    Less than three years since a crackdown against Rohingya, troops are again accused of war crimes – this time against Rakhine Buddhists Kyaw Thu* waited until night fell before taking his family to the bank of a river not far from their village. While millions across the world were told to remain at home to stay safe from the coronavirus pandemic, he and his neighbours were forced to flee. That night in March, he recalls, residents from Tin Ma village, in Rakhine state, clambered anxiously into boats, crossed the river, then trekked through foothills to seek refuge in the relative safety of a nearby town. No one switched on a torch or even lit a cigarette for fear of drawing the attention of Myanmar’s army. Continue reading...

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    Exclusive: big pharma rejected EU plan to fast-track vaccines in 2017

    World’s top drug firms turned down proposals for work on pathogens like coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The world’s largest pharmaceutical companies rejected an EU proposal three years ago to work on fast-tracking vaccines for pathogens like coronavirus to allow them to be developed before an outbreak, the Guardian can reveal. The plan to speed up the development and approval of vaccines was put forward by European commission representatives sitting on the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) – a public-private partnership whose function is to back cutting-edge research in Europe – but it was rejected by industry partners on the body. Continue reading...

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    'Many will starve': locusts devour crops and livelihoods in Pakistan

    Farmers faced with worst plague in recent history say they have been left to fend for themselves Mir Gul Muhammad, a farmer in Balochistan province, was blunt. “The worst that we have ever seen, ever, in our whole life,” he said of the swarms of locusts that descended on his village of Gharok. “I cultivated around 50 acres of cotton crops and all of them have been eaten and destroyed by locusts,” he said. “Besides cotton, my other crops – onion, chilli and tomato – have been affected badly too. It is a loss of around 10m rupees [£51,000]. As a farmer, it will take years to recover from this loss.” Continue reading...

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    Opposition leaders across Europe walk coronavirus tightrope

    Opposition parties struggle to stay politically relevant as leaders ride wave of popularity during pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Opposition politicians across Europe, from cautious centrists to firebrand populists, have had to walk a tricky political tightrope over the past two months, as coronavirus has taken over the political agenda. How to stay politically relevant while governments, even when making errors, are benefiting from a ‘rally round the flag’ effect and seeing approval ratings rise? And how to hold those governments responsible for their mistakes, without playing political games during a health crisis? Continue reading...

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    Why is Trump so quiet about the Biden sexual assault allegation?

    The president rarely misses a chance to sling mud but he has been uncharacteristically quiet about Tara Reade’s claim Sometimes Donald Trump portrays his election rival, Joe Biden, as a sleepy geriatric who should be in a care home because “he doesn’t know he’s alive”. At others, the president speaks of Biden as a wily manipulator who conspired with the deep state and China. Related: Who is Tara Reade and what are her allegations against Joe Biden? Continue reading...

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    US judge rules Florida felons can vote without paying legal fees

    Judge Robert Hinkle says current law is unconstitutional but his ruling is likely to face Republican challenge in key battleground state A law in Florida requiring felons to pay legal fees as part of their sentences before regaining the vote is unconstitutional for those unable to pay, or unable to find out how much they owe, a federal judge has ruled. Related: Democrats not confident 2020 US election will be fair, survey finds Continue reading...

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    Western Australia storm: 50,000 homes without power as state battered by wild weather

    Remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Mangga whip up 100km/h wind gusts, dust storms and heavy rain as Perth and state’s south prepares for onslaught Some 50,000 homes in Western Australia are still without power as the state continues to be battered by wild weather for a second day in a row, in a “rare event” described as a “once-in-a-decade” storm. The state has experienced the wildest autumn weather in years, as the remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Mangga collided with a cold front and trough, whipping up gusts of about 100km/h. Continue reading...

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    Taiwan promises 'support' for Hong Kong's people as China tightens grip

    President Tsai Ing-wen pledges ‘necessary assistance’ after a resurgence in protests against newly proposed security legislation from Beijing Taiwan will provide the people of Hong Kong with “necessary assistance“, President Tsai Ing-wen has said, after a resurgence in protests in the Chinese-ruled territory against newly proposed national security legislation from Beijing. Taiwan has become a refuge for a small but growing number of pro-democracy protesters fleeing Hong Kong, which has been convulsed since last year by protests. Continue reading...

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    Americans defy Covid-19 social distancing rules to celebrate Memorial Day holiday

    Hundreds gather at pool party at Lake of the Ozarks and at Daytona Beach in Florida, defying safety restrictions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Americans across the country appeared to abandon social distancing guidelines as they sunbathed on beaches and gathered for pool parties on Memorial Day weekend. The long weekend traditionally signals the start of the US summer, and despite the country’s Covid-19 death toll approaching 100,000, many revellers dismissed any safety concerns to celebrate. Continue reading...

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    The killing of Ahmaud Arbery

    On 23 February Ahmaud Arbery, a young black man, was shot dead by two white men in Brunswick, Georgia. But it was only when a 36-second video of the killing was leaked on 5 May, generating nationwide outcry, that three men were charged with his murder. Why did it take so long? Ahmaud Arbery was shot on 23 February when Gregory and Travis McMichael, a white father and son, pursued Arbery after spotting him running in their neighbourhood. Gregory McMichael told police he suspected Arbery, who is black, was a burglar and that Arbery attacked his son before being shot. But a video of the incident, leaked on 5 May, showed a different encounter. The two men were arrested and last week William “Roddie” Bryan Jr, 50, who had filmed the incident, was also arrested. A second video, uncovered by Guardian US reporter Sam Levine, shows police attempting to use a Taser on Arbery, after questioning why he was sitting alone in his car in a park one morning in November 2017. Anushka Asthana talks to Sam about what the videos tell us about the systemic harassment of young black men in America and to Guardian US reporter Khushbu Shah about why it took so long for these arrests to take place. Law enforcement in the area is facing heavy scrutiny for the handling of the case. A local prosecutor recommended not bringing charges against the McMichaels in April before recusing himself from the case. She also talks to lawyer L Chris Stewart, who is representing Arbery’s mother Wanda Cooper-Jones, about the case and what it tells us about race in America. Continue reading...

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    Australia has unnecessarily exposed itself to Beijing's fury, but relying on the US now is risky | Jonathan Pearlman

    Australia has mishandled the inquiry into Covid-19, but it is in uncomfortable and unfamiliar territory Sign up for Guardian Australia’s daily coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Coronavirus Australia maps and cases: live numbers and statistics For more than a decade, Australia has faced a seemingly impossible choice: whether to strengthen ties with its closest ally, the United States, or with its largest trading partner, China. But the Covid-19 pandemic – which has highlighted the dangers posed by both Donald Trump’s nativism and Xi Jinping’s authoritarianism – is forcing Australia to confront a new option: choose neither. Continue reading...

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    Surfers brave monster waves as 10-metre swells lash Sydney's coastline – in pictures

    Over the weekend a low-pressure system hung over Sydney which created swells of up to 10 meters. Daredevils headed to ocean pools and beaches to take advantage of the wild weather Continue reading...

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    Tom Brady miracle shot can't prevent defeat to Tiger Woods in $10m charity golf match

    Match was played to raise money for Covid-19 relief Phil Mickelson and Peyton Manning also took part in match Woods and Manning v Mickelson and Brady – as it happened Tom Brady, an athlete acquainted with magnificent comebacks, pulled off a highlight-reel shot during a made-for-TV charity golf match featuring Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Peyton Manning on Sunday. Brady had struggled through the first few holes of the $10m match, in which he was paired with Mickelson, to the point where he was the butt of numerous jokes on Twitter. The six-time Super Bowl champion was playing badly enough that four-time major champion Brooks Koepka said he would donate $100,000 to Covid-19 relief if Brady managed to par any of the first nine holes. NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley, who was on the commentary team, also joined in the teasing. Continue reading...

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    Coronavirus live news: US bars travel from Brazil as British PM’s adviser reported to police over lockdown breach

    Boris Johnson backs Dominic Cummings despite outcry; France sees lowest daily cases and deaths since lockdown; India resumes domestic flights. Follow the latest updates Dominic Cummings facing possible police investigation as pressure mounts Johnson’s defence of Cummings sparks anger from allies and opponents Australia coronavirus – live Coronavirus latest: at a glance 12.22am BST Hello and welcome to today’s live global coverage of the coronavirus pandemic with me, Helen Sullivan. I’ll be bringing you the very latest news for the next few hours – as always, it would be great to hear from you via Twitter @helenrsullivan or email: helen.sullivan[at]theguardian.com. Tips, questions, feedback or fun are welcome. Continue reading...

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    Elite athletes must be able to miss contact training, says report

    Government’s latest guidelines pave way to ‘opt out’ Seven-page document contains eight points of guidance Elite athletes must be given the ability to opt out of a return to contact training, according to new advice from the government that paves the way for the return of the Premier League. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has published the second stage of its “return to training” guidance for elite athletes – the Covid-19 guidelines all sports must follow if they aim to return to competition behind closed doors, should circumstances allow, after 1 June. Continue reading...

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    New Zealand earthquake: PM Jacinda Ardern live on TV in Wellington as North Island hit

    Ardern said she could feel ‘quite a decent shake here’ as the 5.8 quake struck during a live interview New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern was broadcast reacting live on television during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in Wellington on Monday morning. The strong earthquake was centred 30km north west of Levin, a town around an hour’s drive north of the country’s capital, on the North Island. Continue reading...

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    Johnson's defence of Cummings sparks anger from allies and opponents alike

    Possible police investigation of aide is latest in series of Guardian disclosures that have rocked the government Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has staked his political reputation on saving the career of Dominic Cummings, amid growing anger among Conservative MPs that the No 10 chief adviser has not been forced out for breaking lockdown rules. Under intense pressure to explain why Cummings drove his wife, who was suffering coronavirus symptoms, and son 264 miles to his parents’ farm in Durham, the prime minister said on Sunday that Cummings had “acted responsibly, legally and with integrity”. Continue reading...

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    Virginia governor Ralph Northam says masks save lives – then doesn't wear one

    Democrat takes selfies at Virginia Beach Oceanfront Republican to doctor-turned leader: ‘Physician, heal thyself’ Governor Ralph Northam has repeatedly urged Virginia residents to cover their faces in public during the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, he told reporters wearing a mask “could literally save someone else’s life”. Related: North Dakota governor on brink of tears as he decries ‘mask shaming’ Continue reading...

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    Joe Hart: 'All I want is to be a big part of a club ... hope burns through me'

    Former England goalkeeper has started three games this season but he is still only 33 and feels he will have to move abroad to get back into the big time More than 500 days have passed since Joe Hart last played in a Premier League game and so, on Zoom, he leans forward when I say that the hurt of not being picked must eat away at him. “Yeah, but I embrace that feeling,” he says intently. “I’m glad I feel like that because you need that fire in you. You almost need that arrogance to think: ‘Why am I not being picked?’ The reason that I’m at the top fighting, or have been at the top, is because that’s in me.” Hart is 33 and he has been playing professional football for more than 16 years. He made his debut for Shrewsbury the day after he turned 17 and since then has won two Premier League titles with Manchester City, four Golden Gloves and 75 caps for England. After 12 years with City he played for Torino, West Ham and Burnley. But Hart has been in goal for Burnley only three times this season – a Carabao Cup defeat to Sunderland last August and two FA Cup ties, against Peterborough and Norwich, in January. He has been on the bench for all the other games. Continue reading...

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    The Match: Tiger Woods & Peyton Manning v Phil Mickelson & Tom Brady – live!

    Golf and NFL stars compete in $10m round for charity Email Bryan with your thoughts or tweet him @BryanAGraham 7.43pm BST ‘Member sports? Well between the Bundesliga, something called Fight Island and today’s made-for-TV golf exhibition pitting Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning against Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady, they’re all but back to normal. It’s called The Match, not to be confused with the $9m winner-take-all showdown between Tiger and Phil over Thanksgiving weekend in 2018, which also was called The Match, which come to think of it is about as creative a title as Fight Island. Anyhow, the purpose today is to raise $10m or more for Covid-19 relief efforts, which is something everybody can get behind. The venue is Medalist Golf Club in Hobe Sound, Florida – which is Woods’ home course – and they’re due to tee off in about 20 minutes. That’s if the weather complies, as a flood warning is in effect until quarter after the hour. So I’m guessing #TheMatch won’t be teeing off as scheduled. Thanks again, 2020. pic.twitter.com/HH6rfvAqAr 4.38pm BST Bryan will be here shortly, with the match due to start at 3pm ET/8pm BST. In the meantime, here’s a few details on today’s round from the Associated Press: It’s the second edition of a match between Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, the dominant players of their generation and rivals by name, but not necessarily by record. Woods has 82 career victories to 44 for Mickelson, leads 15-5 in major championships and 11-0 in winning PGA Tour player of the year. Mickelson won their first made-for-TV match over Thanksgiving weekend in 2018, a pay-per-view event that ran into technical problems and was free for all. Lefty won in a playoff under the lights for $9m in a winner-take-all match. He also has a 5-3-1 advantage over Woods in the nine times they have played in the final round on the PGA Tour, most recently in the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in 2012 when Mickelson shot 64 to a 75 for Woods. Continue reading...

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    Dominic Cummings facing possible police investigation as pressure mounts

    Exclusive: retired chemistry teacher Robin Lees makes complaint to police about alleged trip to Barnard Castle Timeline: what we know about aide’s movements Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Dominic Cummings is facing a possible police investigation under health laws over a claim that he breached self-isolation rules in north-east England, after a weekend of mounting pressure on the prime minister to sack his chief adviser. Retired chemistry teacher Robin Lees made a complaint to the police after reporting that he saw Cummings and his family on 12 April walking in the town of Barnard Castle before getting into a car, a joint investigation by the Guardian and Mirror can reveal. Continue reading...

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    Ben Jennings on Dominic Cummings' roaming charge – cartoon

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    China raises US trade tensions with warning of ‘new cold war’

    Foreign minister accuses Washington of damaging relationship with Beijing The prospects of a trade war between China and the western economies ratcheted up on Sunday as Beijing accused the US of pushing relations towards a “new cold war”. “China has no intention to change, still less replace the United States,” China’s foreign minister, Wang Yi, said on Sunday in the latest escalation in tensions between the world’s two largest economies. “It’s time for the United States to give up its wishful thinking of changing China and stopping 1.4 billion people in their historic march toward modernisation.” Continue reading...

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    The Guardian view on Dominic Cummings: the unaccountable elite | Editorial

    Boris Johnson’s absurd defence of his adviser shows his contempt for the public Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated? Boris Johnson has previously lauded the effort and sacrifice of the British people, who for nine weeks of lockdown have endured not only inconvenience and discomfort, but hardship and in many cases real sacrifice: of desperately needed income, of the opportunity to support struggling relatives, see dying family members, or attend the funerals of loved ones. Now it emerges that the rules are optional for the prime minister’s friends. The stated message was: “Stay at home”. The unstated: “Do as we say, and not as we do”. The breach of rules by Mr Johnson’s adviser Dominic Cummings, revealed by the Guardian and the Mirror, is not an abstruse Westminster affair involving complicated financial dealings, or arcane parliamentary regulations. It is a matter that everyone understands and in which everyone has a stake, because everyone has given up something they valued and many have paid dearly. People feel not just indignation, but rage. Continue reading...

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    Australia’s ‘failing’ environmental laws will fuel further public health crises, Nobel laureate warns

    Bushfires and Covid-19 highlight connection between human health and natural world, states letter by almost 200 doctors and scientists Leading health professionals, including a Nobel laureate and a former Australian of the Year, say the government must put human health “front and centre” in a new generation of environment laws in the aftermath of the Covid-19 and bushfire crises. The Nobel prize-winning immunologist Peter Doherty and the epidemiologist and former Australian of the Year Fiona Stanley are among 180 professionals who have warned the government that Australia’s “failing” environmental laws will fuel further public health crises. Continue reading...

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    Well put together: four dressings that work for every salad

    Upping your salad dressing repertoire allows you to transform a dull bowl of leaves into something fancy The secret to a great salad is a great dressing. Dressing your salad leaves like they’re about to appear on the Met Gala red carpet turns them from a second thought to fulfil your daily vegetable quota into a meal’s supportive understudy – ready to step in, perform and outshine if need be. Don’t worry, no foul play involved. Like the friend who is able to impressively clear and coordinate everyone’s iCal schedule for a weekend away, it’s the dressing that brings everything together. Continue reading...

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    Coronavirus latest: at a glance

    A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading...

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    Mary Pierce: three passports, two grand slams, one overbearing father | Tumaini Carayol

    The French-American-Canadian who won at Roland Garros 20 years ago could turn opponents into spectators, but despite her talent it was a pushy parent that often stole the show Twenty years ago, Mary Pierce was being dragged across the court. As she chased Monica Seles’s blows from side-to-side during their 2000 French Open quarter-final match, one vicious drive volley flew straight towards her. Pierce instinctively leaped into the air and connected with the ball between her legs, which lobbed high over Seles’s head and landed perfectly inside the court. The shot has been replayed millions of times. For most players, Pierce’s famous tweener would have been a great omen of things to come. But tennis fans had spent a decade as attuned to Pierce’s demeanour as the actual strokes. The question was always, after all she had been through, if she was relaxed and loose enough to ever fly. As the crowd roa red, the answer came: Pierce sprinted the width of the court in glee and a smile glossed her face. A few days later she had beaten the world No 3, Seles, the No 1, Martina Hingis, and Conchita Martínez, the No 5, and become the first French singles champion at Roland Garros since 1983. Continue reading...

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    Daniel Abt guilty of using a ringer to drive for him in Formula E esport race

    German fined €10,000 and stripped of points for third place Rivals Vandoorne and Vergne raised suspicions immediately The Audi Formula E driver Daniel Abt has been found guilty of using a ringer to drive for him in the Formula E esportchampionship. Abt has been disqualified from the race, fined €10,000 and as stripped of all his points after it was discovered he used a professional esport racer to compete in his place. The race took place on Saturday as part of the Formula E Race at Home Challenge Series, a virtual championship taking place while real racing is on hold because of coronavirus. Abt had qualified in second place at the virtual Flughafen Tempelhof circuit in Berlin and finished in third behind Oliver Rowland and the former F1 driver Stoffel Vandoorne. Continue reading...

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    Bundesliga roundup: Werner treble fires Leipzig back to third, Schalke crash

    RB striker makes it 24 league goals this season Augsburg shock Schalke with 3-0 away win Timo Werner scored a hat-trick as RB Leipzig demolished hosts Mainz 5-0 on Sunday to reclaim third place in the Bundesliga after last week’s draw with Freiburg. Related: Mainz 0-5 RB Leipzig: Bundesliga – as it happened Continue reading...

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    Elon Musk’s SpaceX to launch first astronauts from US soil since 2011

    Falcon 9 rocket to make history as billionaire seeks to commercialise space travel Elon Musk’s SpaceX company hopes to make history on Wednesday by launching the first astronauts into space from US soil in nine years, as the billionaire takes the next step in his dream to commercialise space travel. Donald Trump will be among the spectators at Kennedy space centre in Florida to witness the launch, which has been given the green light despite the coronavirus lockdown. Continue reading...

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    Boris Johnson backs Dominic Cummings in face of Tory calls for chief aide to resign

    Prime minister says key adviser acted ‘responsibly, legally and with integrity’ Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has pledged his complete support for Dominic Cummings over a trip to a distant family home during the peak of the lockdown, using a Downing Street press conference to insist his chief adviser “acted responsibly, legally and with integrity”. Facing intense pressure to explain why Cummings appeared to have flouted lockdown rules by driving more than 260 miles to his parents’ estate in Durham with his wife and young son after his wife became ill, the prime minister said Cummings had simply been trying to keep his family safe. Continue reading...

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    Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit postpones first space launch

    Virgin Galactic sister company aims to launch dummy satellite Elon Musk’s Crew Dragon puts America back in the space race Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit postponed its first space launch on Sunday, due to a technical problem. Related: Richard Branson to sell $500m worth of Virgin Galactic shares Continue reading...

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    Fifteen-year-old in India cycles 745 miles home with disabled father on bike

    Jyoti Kumari said desperate ride from New Delhi to Bihar decided on after rickshaw work ended in Covid-19 crisis Coronavirus – latest updates From her village in east India, 15-year-old Jyoti Kumari reflected on her desperate 745-mile cycle home with her disabled father, a journey that has drawn international praise. “I had no other option,” she said on Sunday. “We wouldn’t have survived if I hadn’t cycled to my village.” Continue reading...

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    Democratic VP contender Demings slams Trump 'gall' over Biden black voters gaffe

    Val Demings castigates president for using Biden’s gaffe as a weapon on the campaign trail Val Demings, a Democratic representative from Florida among contenders to be Joe Biden’s running mate in the presidential election, has castigated Donald Trump for having the “gall and nerve” to use a gaffe by Biden as a weapon on the campaign trail. Biden apologised on Friday, after saying that if African Americans “have a problem figuring out whether you’re for me or Trump, then you ain’t black”. The remark prompted gleeful tweets from Trump, fierce attacks from supporters of the president and criticism from Biden’s own backers. Continue reading...

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    Georgia's Nikoloz Basilashvili arrested on domestic violence charge

    World No 27 alleged to have assaulted his former wife Offence carries maximum sentence of three years’ jail Nikoloz Basilashvili, the Georgian tennis player, has been arrested on a domestic violence charge in the capital, Tbilisi. Basilashvili, No 27 in the ATP rankings, is alleged to have assaulted his former wife, Neka Dorokashvili, in front of a minor on 21 May. A day later, the 28-year-old was arrested. On Sunday, Tbilisi city court decided on a bail of 100,000 Georgian Lari (around £26,000), . The preliminary court date is set for 16 July. Continue reading...

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    Mother of Manchester teenager killed in 2019 dies 'with broken heart'

    Debbie Makki never accepted jury’s verdicts and complained about police investigation A mother who had been fighting for answers following the stabbing of her teenage son in Greater Manchester has died “with a broken heart”, her family said. Debbie Makki died on Sunday morning, 15 months after her son, Yousef Makki, was killed by a friend in Hale Barns, Greater Manchester, last March. Continue reading...

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    Jaws masks and cut-out sports fans: best photos of the weekend

    The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world Continue reading...

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    Jair Bolsonaro branded a 'killer' for hot dog trip as Covid-19 death toll soars

    Brazilian president subject to public anger after stepping out in Brasilia on fast food errand Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Brazilian president, Jair Bolsonaro, was branded a “killer” by his opponents after he popped out for a Saturday night hot dog on the day a further 965 of his citizens were reported to have died from Covid-19. Bolsonaro, a rightwing populist who basks in comparisons to Donald Trump, has repeatedly flouted health ministry physical distancing guidelines – and continued to do so this weekend, even as Brazil’s coronavirus death toll rose to over 22,000. Continue reading...

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    From wonky tables to broken printers: how to solve the most irritating household problems

    There has never been a better time than lockdown to fix things around the house. The Repair Shop’s Jay Blades and other experts offer tips on how to do it yourself The lockdown is a good opportunity to learn to repair some commonly broken items. Not only do many of us have more time on our hands than usual, but shops are closed so we can’t easily replace items, and many expert restorers are shut, too. Prolonged proximity to your belongings, and a keener eye on your finances, may have given you a newfound appreciation for your stuff and the planet’s resources. These days you can find a wealth of fix-it tutorials online, but here’s where to start. Continue reading...

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    Benjamin Netanyahu appears in court on corruption charges

    Israeli PM could face over a decade in prison if convicted in three separate cases Defiantly railing against attempts to “overthrow” him before donning a face mask to enter court, Benjamin Netanyahu sat for the first day of his high-profile corruption trial, which threatens to put Israel’s longest-serving leader behind bars and open deep divisions within the country. Speaking in the corridors of the courthouse before entering, Netanyahu decried police and prosecutors he accused of attempting to topple him. “When there is a strong rightwing leader like me, everything is permitted to bring him down,” he said, flanked by loyal ministers. “This is an attempt to overthrow us.” Continue reading...

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    Coronavirus US live: Trump under fire over golf trip as New York Times lists lives lost

    Trump tees up controversy as he plays golf in a pandemic ‘Incalculable loss’: paper covers front page with death notices Coronavirus – latest global updates Get a fresh perspective on America – sign up to our First Thing newsletter 2.28pm BST White House public health adviser Dr Deborah Birx is appearing on Fox News Sunday and according to Fox News Sunday, she says: “President Trump does wear a mask when he is unable to social distance from others.” Trump’s reluctance to wear a mask in public or apparently in private has become a running theme of the coronavirus pandemic, particularly since cases were confirmed in the White House, close to the president himself. This week, at a Ford plant in Michigan, Trump was pictured wearing one. Related: North Dakota governor on brink of tears as he decries ‘mask shaming’ 2.11pm BST Talk shows up. White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett tells CNN’s State of the Union he expects unemployment to go “north of 20%” before any correction, which means figures will be higher in June. Nearly 40m Americans have filed for unemployment under the pandemic, after all. Related: US unemployment rises by 2.4m despite easing of coronavirus lockdowns Continue reading...

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    Lockdown meant I missed my brother's funeral. Dominic Cummings should be ashamed | Diane Nowell

    Up and down the country, people have made painful sacrifices because we thought we were all in this together The last funeral I attended was back in January. It was just a few months ago, and yet reflecting on it today feels like peering into the past through a smeared lens. We gathered at the local crematorium and although the occasion was undeniably sad, it also felt quietly celebratory. My neighbour, a doughty 96-year-old, had lived a full and fascinating life, spanning some of the most remarkable events of human history. There was a slideshow of photos, a this-is-your-life eulogy by the celebrant and heartfelt words of remembrance from his daughter. Later, over tea and sandwiches, we swapped stories and agreed that Peter’s was a life well lived; that he’d had a good end. Continue reading...

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    'I miss my homeland': fearful Uighurs celebrate Eid in exile in Turkey

    Istanbul has become world’s largest diaspora hub for Uighurs fleeing Chinese persecution In Hayrı Gül’s house, there was a lot to do before the Eid al-Fitr, or Bayram, holiday marking the end of Ramadan began on Saturday. There were traditional sangza noodles to bake, then twist into ropes and pile into pyramids. Special occasion clothes needed to be washed and ironed. Celebrating the Muslim holiday is a freedom Gül and her four children did not have at home in China’s western Xinjiang province, the Uighur homeland, where over the last few years the authorities have suffocated the ethnic minority’s cultural practices and turned the entire region into a police state subject to strict surveillance even inside their homes. Up to 1 million people have disappeared into re-education camps in what China says is a necessary measure to stamp out extremism. Continue reading...

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    Defence of Dominic Cummings is shameful, says ex-Durham police chief

    Mike Barton brands UK government ‘self-privileged hypocrites’ who have damaged public trust Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The former chief constable of Durham police has launched a strident attack on Dominic Cummings and the government defending him, branding them self-privileged hypocrites who have damaged the fight against coronavirus at a time of national emergency. Mike Barton, who stepped down as chief constable last year, said the government’s defence of Boris Johnson’s chief adviser was causing extensive damage as police try to get the public to obey lockdown rules. Continue reading...

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    Mainz v RB Leipzig: Bundesliga – live!

    All the action from the Opel Arena Email rob.smyth@theguardian.com 1.22pm BST Hello. At the end of January, RB Leipzig were top of the table and dreaming of winning the Bundesliga for the first time in their short history. They are unbeaten since then, yet have dropped down to fifth in the table. Leipzig are a case study in the dangers of the draw, with five in their last seven games. You don’t need to be a descendant of Pythagoras to know that means they’ve dropped ten points. While it looks like a textbook case of an outsider title challenge fading away, that’s not necessarily the case. All five draws were against teams in the top seven, including an excellent away point at Bayern Munich. It means that Leipzig have a really favourable run-in. Continue reading...

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    Knocking down barriers through boxing – photo essay

    A gym in Bristol has become a vital mental health service for young people with a combination of boxing, psychological support and personal development. Before the lockdown, Alexander Turner spoke to and photographed the coaches and mentors behind the project – and the young people whose lives have been transformed Founded by Martin Bisp and Jamie Sanigar in 2006, Empire Fighting Chance (EFC) has transformed the Empire Boxing gym – a respected Bristol institution since the 1960s – into a vital mental health service operating in the centre of the city. With world heavyweight champion Tyson Fury frequently advocating the value of boxing and fitness towards his own mental health, the connection with boxing and emotional health has never been stronger. EFC predominantly works with people aged eight to 25 who experience significant challenges in their lives, including those excluded from school and involved in antisocial behaviour – almost always as a result of mental health issues. With a unique programme of support, EFC provides an invaluable resource to more than 4,000 people each year in one of the UK’s most deprived areas. It offers young people who would probably not access traditional forms of therapy a variety of bespoke services designed to support complicated home lives, blighted by poverty, deprivation and inadequate housing. Continue reading...

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    Lockdown playlists for every mood, part three: chosen by Bat for Lashes, Neil Tennant, Jason Williamson and Mike Skinner

    Music stars pick soundtracks to get you through the next phase - for moments of melancholy, optimism, escapism and contemplation Lockdown playlists part one: chosen by Jarvis Cocker, Haim and Lianne La Havas Lockdown playlists part two: chosen by Norah Jones, Joe Talbot and Flohio At her home of three years in Los Angeles, Natasha Khan and her boyfriend are having a particularly unusual lockdown, because she is six-and-half-months pregnant. “Going through all this on our own is a bit sad,” she says. “But weirdly, it’s a bit of nesting time, anyway. It’s been good to bed down.” She’s also been loving the “incredible colours” of spring blooming all around: the jasmine, tropical plants and orange poppies on the mountains. Continue reading...

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    In brief: Writers & Lovers; Flash Crash; The Pattern in the Carpet – review

    A young writer struggles with love, student loans and grief; the loner who triggered the 2010 financial crash from his bedroom; and Margaret Drabble’s story of depression and jigsaws Continue reading...

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    Spotify podcast deal could make Joe Rogan world's highest paid broadcaster

    Streaming service must convince podcast listeners to switch from their favourite app Joe Rogan, the comedian, MMA commentator and podcaster, may seem an unlikely prospect for becoming the world’s highest paid broadcaster. But after signing an exclusive deal with Spotify, that is what he may have become, marking a new era for podcasting in the process. To much of the world, Rogan’s name is most associated with the periodic furores that erupt from the marathon interviews around which his podcast is structured. Continue reading...

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    Gloves, masks and red tape: what it's like to eat out in a pandemic | Megan Tatum

    Malaysia’s restaurants are reopening with social distancing measures, but maintaining the ambience is proving to be the biggest challenge Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage I slide the mask up over my nose and lean towards the electronic thermometer. “You have a temperature of 36.8C,” says the smiling restaurant maitre-D. At least I assume he’s smiling. His own surgical mask is pulled up to right below the eyes. He gestures with gloved hands to a guestbook in which I record my name and phone number. These details will be submitted into a centralised database and retained for 30 days. Should anyone in the restaurant test positive for Covid-19, the Malaysian government will trace any diners who may have come into contact with them that evening and tell them to self-isolate. I cast a furtive glance at my fellow diners to see how healthy they look before venturing in. These measures aren’t exactly key ingredients for a relaxing meal with friends. But then again, we are dining out in the middle of a global pandemic. Continue reading...

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    Explainer: what do we now know about Covid-19 – and can you get it twice?

    Your questions answered based on current knowledge and the latest research from scientists Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage That remains unclear. A key question is whether antibodies produced by the body following an infection with the coronavirus provide some level of immunity, and if so, for how long. Continue reading...

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    There are ways we can get our sport back: Leeds doctor on a safe return | Aaron Bower

    Rishi Dhand, a GP and medic for Leeds United and Castleford Tigers, examines the problems facing quarantine rules and sport These are unprecedented times for anyone associated with professional sport, not least those who have a critical role in determining how we return to normality in the weeks ahead: medical staff. Rishi Dhand is a GP in West Yorkshire but at weekends he is the club doctor for both Leeds United and Super League’s Castleford Tigers. It is people like Dhand who will be instrumental in making sure any sports fan gets to see live action this summer, even if it is from behind closed doors. Medics will be decisive in implementing protocols that ensure safe environments for players, something Dhand says will be a markedly different process depending on the sport. Continue reading...

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    Covid-19 has rocked women's sport but its future remains bright

    Hope and determination abound throughout professional women’s sport despite the profound challenges brought by the coronavirus pandemic The images come from a different time and place: before the sporting world became submerged in sepia and nostalgia, before the great stasis began. Dina Asher-Smith running a bend so geometrically perfect it could have been drawn by a compass before rocketing to the first global sprint title won by a British woman. The MCG swollen with a record 86,174 crowd watching Australia’s cricketers win the Women’s T20 World Cup. England’s Lionesses attracting so many converts and casuals to their cause that unheard of numbers – 11.8m people, in fact – tune in for their World Cup semi-final against the USA. In truth the most striking sporting photograph of the past 12 months – that of Megan Rapinoe with her arms wide and chin regally tilted in celebration – felt like a metaphor for women’s sport itself: standing tall, oozing attitude, ready to take the fight to all-comers. No wonder that throughout 2019 and early 2020 there was a sense of tectonic plates being shifted, and prejudices being shattered. But then came the Covid-19 pandemic. And with it a clawing fear that what had been made could be rapidly unmade. Continue reading...

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    Why does medicine treat women like men?

    Women’s bodies are different from men’s from cellular level upwards, yet the same treatments are usually prescribed for both sexes – to the detriment of women. Dr Alyson McGregor raises the alarm Towards the end of her training in emergency medicine at Brown University, Rhode Island, Dr Alyson McGregor was asked what her “specialism” would be. “You are expected to have a niche so my answer was, ‘Well, I like women’s health,’” says McGregor. “From that, people thought, ‘Oh, she’s into obstetrics/gynaecology.’” So on busy shifts in the emergency department of Rhode Island Hospital, the state’s major trauma centre, the newly qualified McGregor became everyone’s go-to doctor for pelvic examinations because this was believed to be her special interest. “I laugh about it now, but it’s when I started to realise that there’s this assumption that women’s health is wrapped up in their reproduction. Women were men with ‘boobs and tubes’.” Continue reading...

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    'It’s going to be very hard': pandemic leaves academy players in limbo | Ed Aarons

    Many teenagers have been unable to find a new club and there are fears they could be lost to the game Zubayr Boadi thought his big chance had finally arrived. Having spent two years on the fringes of the academy system, the 16-year-old defensive midfielder from south London who models his game on Chelsea’s N’Golo Kanté was invited for a week’s trial at Derby in March in the hope of earning his first professional contract. “It was a great experience for me,” says Boadi, who attended trials at the French clubs Le Havre and Amiens in February. Despite all three having indicated a desire to sign a player previously briefly on the books at Chelsea, Tottenham and Fulham, the coronavirus pandemic has meant his fledgling career has been put on hold. Continue reading...

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    Coronavirus latest: at a glance

    A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading...

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    My favourite game: Dundee shock Rangers in seven-goal thriller | Stephen Flynn

    Simon Stainrod’s side were expected to be blown away by the champions but instead they put on a remarkable show Dundee were thinking big at the start of the 1992-93 season, their first in the Premier Division for two years. The manager, Simon Stainrod, had revamped the squad, with the former Everton captain Kevin Ratcliffe and the former Arsenal midfielder Graham Rix among that summer’s arrivals. The club’s new home strip was modelled on Sampdoria, who had been European Cup finalists that year. And the club’s owner, the Canadian businessman Ron Dixon, had plans to build a new stand at Dens Park with an ice rink underneath. But three matches into the season, and despite being handed a gentle start with games against Falkirk, Airdrie and St Johnstone, Dundee were still looking for their first win. And the best team in the country were up next. Continue reading...

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    Unnamed Bournemouth player self-isolates following positive Covid-19 test

    Two positive tests from 996 players and staff across league EFL announce two positive tests at a Championship club Bournemouth have announced that one of the two positive Covid-19 tests from the Premier League’s second round of screening is a player from their squad. The club did not divulge his identity. He will now self-isolate for seven days. Related: Two more Watford players isolate while UK quarantine rules may hit Uefa plans Continue reading...

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    Chicago’s population is just 30% black, but makes up 60% of its Covid-19 deaths

    Black residents also make up a quarter of Illinois’ confirmed cases, highlighting the systemic racism at the root of the problem Coronavirus – latest US updates Coronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus has taken a heavy toll on Chicago, with nearly 65,000 confirmed infections in Cook county and about 3,000 deaths. But the virus has hit black Chicagoans the hardest, shining a spotlight on racial inequalities that existed long before the pandemic. Continue reading...

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    Race, wealth and public spaces: US beaches are a new flashpoint of the lockdown

    Beaches are a polarizing issue amid the pandemic. Experts say that’s because a ‘frenzy of privatization’ led to smaller, more crowded public spaces As Florida’s beaches shut down in April, part of the state’s pandemic stay-at-home order, Josh Davis noticed something strange in Palm Beach county. “A lot of that beach crowd just kind of moved on to the road and the sidewalk. People set up lawn chairs on the grass,” said Davis, an ocean rescue lifeguard with the county. “If the goal was to keep people from congregating, all it did was really push them a few feet away.” Continue reading...

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    Matthew Henson: the pioneering African-American Arctic adventurer

    This multi-skilled explorer may well have been first to the North Pole – in 1909. What’s not in doubt is his resourcefulness and love of the Inuit Passport detailsMatthew Alexander Henson, perhaps the first person to the North Pole. Born Charles County, Maryland, US, 8 August 1866. Claim to fameMatthew Henson, the descendant of slaves, has a plausible claim to being the first explorer to reach the North Pole. He grew up in Washington DC and Baltimore, was orphaned and left school at 12 to be a cabin boy. When he was 22, a chance encounter with naval engineer Robert Peary resulted in a lifelong working relationship, including 18 years of Arctic exploration. On 6 April 1909, Henson, Peary and four Inuit drove their dogsleds to the North Pole – or as near as makes no difference. Peary took the credit for being first, but a newspaper article on their return quoted Henson as saying he’d been part of a leading group that had overshot the pole by several miles: “We went back then and I could see my footprints were the first at the spot.” Continue reading...

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    Fumbling the nuclear football: is Trump blundering to arms control chaos?

    The president believes he alone can negotiate away nuclear weapons and win a Nobel prize – but he has quit three treaties and gutted his administration of experts The Trump administration signaled this week that it was ready to get back in the business of nuclear arms control. A newly appointed envoy, Marshall Billingslea, made his first public remarks to announce talks with Russia are about to resume. “We have concrete ideas for our next interaction, and we’re finalizing the details as we speak,” Billingslea said. Continue reading...

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    As a sci-fi fan, I'd like to say: this Covid stuff is too far-fetched

    The number of ludicrous thought experiments being conducted on us is unbelievable Well, this is all really bloody interesting, isn’t? Absolutely shitbiscuitly fascinating. Words, in fact, fail me when I attempt to describe how spafftwuntingly mesmerising every facet of life in the shuntspackled UK has become. I mean, who knew it was possible to run so many thought experiments simultaneously in the real world? Don’t get me wrong: I’m a huge fan of sci-fi and stories that begin “What if?” But did we have to run all of this, all at once? And did we have to make our experiments in thinking involve non-theoretical, living (at the moment) and (currently) breathing human beings? I may be a caffeine-addled hermit swaddled in army surplus lockdown athleisurewear and have a drunk marmoset’s haircut. I may be only partly sustained by brief Zoom views of unattainable domestic interiors and smiles other than my own. I may now speak mostly to my dead-eyed sourdough starter. (Yes, I know the eyes are just stuck on the jar, but sometimes... it judges me.) Still, even in my degraded and manifestly twitchy condition I can still count: one sheet of toilet paper, two sheets of toilet paper, far too much toilet paper... See? I can studfracking count. And by my reckoning we are currently running at least 10 experiments of the kind that give thinking a bad name. 1) What if we hand all power – apparently for ever – to a clammy handful of sociopathic narcissist sex pests who are threatened by facts and harbour sadistic fantasies which somehow combine TV variety specials and forced sterilisations in basements under bloodstained sports arenas? Continue reading...

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    Scratching the surface: drones cast new light on mystery of Nazca Lines

    An aerial search in the Peruvian desert has revealed intriguing figures of humans and animals that predate the nearby Unesco world heritage site A faded decades-old black-and-white photograph was the only lead Johny Isla had when he set out on the trail of a sea monster. The Peruvian archaeologist spotted the image at a 2014 exhibition in Germany about the Nazca Lines, the vast and intricate desert images which attract tens of thousands of tourists every year. Continue reading...

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    Beijing to impose Hong Kong security laws 'without delay'

    China says it will rush through anti-sedition law as police fire teargas at protesters Beijing has vowed to force controversial national security laws on Hong Kong “without the slightest delay” as police in the semi-autonomous territory fired teargas at protesters demonstrating against the unprecedented decision. Speaking in Beijing, China’s foreign minister, Wang Yi, said enacting the proposed anti-sedition law to stop anti-government protests that have persisted for the past year had become a “pressing obligation”. Continue reading...

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    UK coronavirus live: Tory MP Steve Baker calls for Dominic Cummings to go

    Grant Shapps to defend No 10 advisor on Sunday morning politics shows amid revelations of further breaches of lockdown rules New witnesses cast doubt on Dominic Cummings’s lockdown claims 9.39am BST And a further Tory MP, Dominic Collins, has joined those clamouring for Cummings’ resignation. Dominic Cummings has a track record of believing that the rules don’t apply to him and treating the scrutiny that should come to anyone in a position of authority with contempt. The government would be better without him. 9.35am BST This from the journalist Joe Lo: Looks like Tory MP Julian Knight has just deleted his retweet of support for Dominic Cummings https://t.co/IBnf5RYaDA Continue reading...

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    My family's history reveals the terrible toll that a pandemic takes on mental health | Ros Coward

    Spanish flu killed an ancestor and polio terrified my parents, but the effects upon survivors ripple through the generations to this day See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus – latest updates Many experts are warning that this pandemic will leave a legacy of mental health issues. But these warnings sometimes seem vague. If you want to know exactly what this might mean, your own family history could be the place to start. Mine is probably typical in showing how the psychological legacy of an epidemic can last for many generations. But my history also suggests that living with quarantine and lockdown has been much more a part of social experience than we perhaps realise. Continue reading...

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    Sex, lies and despair: unseen letters reveal Larkin's tortured love

    A cache of 2,400 letters between the poet and his long-time lover and muse, Monica Jones, charts an explosive and flawed romance “He lied to me, the bugger, but I loved him.” So Monica Jones described the revered poet Philip Larkin – a pithy but affectionate account of a lover who was serially unfaithful, but whose “utterly undistinguished little house” in Hull she turned into a shrine after his death. Previously unpublished letters, however, reveal the full extent of her fury, fears and frustrations over a painful four-decade-long partnership with the man who wrote some of the most cherished verse in the English language. Continue reading...

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    The weak defence of Dominic Cummings further erodes trust in the government | Andrew Rawnsley

    The prime minister’s chief aide has only survived so far because of the indulgence of Boris Johnson So now we know why the government is struggling to set up a reliable “track and trace” system. The technology does not yet exist to track and trace the prime minister’s chief adviser to ensure that he is complying with the lockdown rules that the rest of the country has been drilled to obey. Since his rule-breaking was revealed, there has been a wave of demands for the resignation of Dominic Cummings and it is likely to grow stronger after today’s additional allegations. This much is common ground and undenied by Downing Street. He left his family home when his wife had coronavirus symptoms and he feared he had contracted the disease, which it turned out he had. They travelled a long way: London to Durham is not a trip to the local shops for essential items. His Durham-based parents, both in their seventies, are in a high-vulnerability age group. That was a breach of the rules on lockdown which the entire nation was expected to obey on penalty of being found in transgression of the law. The government instructions which he had a hand in drawing up were not vague, but crystal in their clarity. If any member of a household has symptoms, “do not leave your home for any reason”. Continue reading...

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    Sweden 'wrong' not to shut down, says former state epidemiologist

    Scientist who oversaw the response to Sars says country has failed the vulnerable Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The predecessor of Sweden’s state epidemiologist has broken her silence on the country’s controversial coronavirus strategy, saying she now believes the authorities should have put in place tougher restrictions in the early stages of the pandemic to bring the virus under control.Annika Linde, who oversaw Sweden’s response to swine flu and Sars as state epidemiologist from 2005 to 2013, had until now expressed support for her country’s approach under her successor, Anders Tegnell. But she has now become the first member of the public health establishment to break ranks, saying she has changed her mind as a result of Sweden’s relatively high death toll compared with that of its neighbours, Denmark, Norway, and Finland. “I think that we needed more time for preparedness. If we had shut down very early ... we would have been able, during that time, to make sure that we had what was necessary to protect the vulnerable,” Linde told the Observer. Continue reading...

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    Will Covid-19 show us how to design better cities?

    Around the world, cities are cleaner and quieter. Can we reinvent them – and ensure that the changes forced upon them in the last few months are not squandered? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 has changed the way that towns and cities look. It has offered views of public places with fewer cars and cleaner air, roads you can stroll down, cycling without danger. It has made some things seem more precious, such as green spaces and parks. It has renewed appreciation of the social infrastructures of support and care. It has heightened awareness of the ways in which one person’s actions can affect another’s. It has made everyone more conscious of the ways they occupy space in relation to other people. It has also prompted the idea that big cities have taken a hit from which they won’t fully recover. The virus first appeared in Wuhan, population 11 million, and some of its worst outbreaks have been in New York, London, Milan and São Paulo. Crowds and public transport, goes the theory, are bad for your health. Remote working, boosted by lockdowns, will be here to stay. Balaji Srinivasan, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist summed this view up in a pithy tweet: “Sell city, buy country.” Continue reading...

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    Annie Mac: ‘I'm happy in chaos and noise’

    Annie Mac is not your average DJ. Through her Radio 1 show and hit podcast, she has championed new music and is not afraid to tackle grittier subjects such as misogyny in rap and knife crime. Laura Snapes finds out what drives her and the secret of her self-confidence Annie Mac is busy doing her homework when I reach her by video one morning in early May. She’s due to give her weekly “rave lesson” on fellow BBC Radio 1 presenter Nick Grimshaw’s teatime show (today’s subject: the week-long Castlemorton party of 1992). I had wondered if these lessons were a sneaky way of teaching teenagers how to kickstart parties in the wreckage of the UK’s pandemic-stricken live scene, but no, Mac says it’s about “remembering the culture of how British people danced”, and, resonant now, “when people are finding new ways to feel together when they’re not allowed to gather to listen to music”. I’ve always felt, I dunno, touch all the wood, pretty good about my existence, basically Continue reading...

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    The Swamp by Yoshiharu Tsuge review – powerfully strange

    A gritty and humorous postwar Japan is depicted in these early works by the influential manga cartoonist Whichever way you look at it, the publication of The Swamp by Yoshiharu Tsuge is a big deal. Tsuge, who was born in Tokyo in 1937 and made his mark in the 60s working for Garo magazine, is a hugely influential cartoonist: the first manga-ka to put his characters’ interior lives fully at the heart of his stories, strips that he also used to revisit Japan’s native customs in the face of the rush to westernisation that followed the second world war. But though his name is widely revered in the comics world – in February, he received a lifetime achievement award at the Angoulême festival in France, which also staged a major retrospective of his work – many of his cartoons have never been translated into English. The Swamp, which gathers together 11 stories from the mid-60s, is the first volume in a series of seven by Tsuge that Drawn & Quarterly plans to publish in the coming years. What are they like, these early tales? I found them powerfully strange: here was a world I had not encountered before, and it took a little getting used to. The Japan they depict is still highly traditional, with all the visual pleasure this suggests: Tsuge’s drawings, though hardly beautiful, are intensely expressive. But the keeping up of social appearances involved in everyday life only makes the desperate poverty suffered by his characters harder to bear. In Destiny, a young samurai and his wife are so hard up, they agree a suicide pact. In Chirpy, a broke cartoonist and his hostess girlfriend must make do with a pet java sparrow rather than a child. In The Phoney Warrior, another struggling samurai pretends to be a famous warrior, to con people out of their cash with displays of his swordsmanship. Continue reading...

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    KSI: Dissimulation review – a pugnacious debut

    (BMG)The boxing, rapping British YouTube star enters hip-hop’s major league Dissimulation is the pugnacious solo debut LP of UK rapper KSI. Straight outta Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, Olajide Olatunji first found renown as a YouTuber, leveraging his gaming and comedy videos into 21st-century fame. Best known for defeating YouTuber Logan Paul in a 2019 boxing match, KSI has run a legit musical side-gig since 2015, when he released Lamborghini, a nagging tune aimed squarely at his young male fanbase (21.3 million YouTube subscribers, social media “reach” of 50 million). Related: KSI: ‘Money gravitates towards me’ Continue reading...

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    The US doctors taking Trump’s lead on hydroxychloroquine – despite mixed results

    The American Association of Physicians and Surgeons, a fringe group, offers advice that isn’t ‘consistent with evidence-based medicine’, experts say Coronavirus – live US updates Live global updates There is an alternate universe of Covid-19 misinformation masquerading as science, which with the encouragement of Donald Trump, is proliferating among his supporters. Among the most ardent proponents of these claims is the American Association of Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS), a fringe group of less than 5,000 doctors. The group was recently cited by Trump’s campaign manager, Brad Parscale, to explain the president’s stunning announcement that he is taking the drug hydroxychloroquine in an attempt to protect himself against Covid-19 despite a lack of evidence of its effectiveness. Continue reading...

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    The British Jews who fought postwar fascism on London's streets

    ‘43 Group’ battled rightwing thugs who continued to torment them even after defeat of the Nazi regime In 1939, Jules Konopinski escaped the Nazis “by the skin of my teeth” when he fled to the UK as a nine-year-old boy. Eight years later, he found himself fighting fascism with his fists and boots on the streets of London, despite a world war that had supposedly defeated the scourge of nazism for ever. Konopinski, now 90, joined the 43 Group, a guerrilla army of British-Jewish ex-servicemen and others that waged physical battle against the far right in the aftermath of the war. “The enemy hadn’t gone away,” he told the Observer. Continue reading...

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    Elon Musk's Crew Dragon puts America back in the space race

    The launch of the billionaire’s vessel will be the first manned US flight since shuttle missions were shut down nine years ago When American astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley arrive at the International Space Station this week, they will find an unusual message waiting for them. On the inside of the hatch where their SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to dock, a small stars and stripes flag has been sealed in a plastic bag with a cryptic message attached. “Flown on STS-1 and STS-135. Only to be removed by a crew launched from KSC.” It sounds enigmatic but the meaning is straightforward. The flag, which measures 8 inches by 12 inches, was flown on board the first space shuttle mission (STS-1) in 1981. And it was carried aloft in 2011 when the shuttle Atlantis rendezvoused with the space station on the last shuttle mission (STS-135). KSC simply stands for the Kennedy Space Centre. Continue reading...

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    Europe's Covid predicament – how do you solve a problem like the anti-vaxxers?

    Compulsory vaccination risks boosting a protest movement gaining ground in Europe’s cities Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate a politically incongruous crowd of protesters gathered on Saturday. They wore flowers in their hair, hazmat suits emblazoned with the letter Q, badges displaying the old German imperial flag or T-shirts reading “Gates, My Ass” – a reference to the US software billionaire Bill Gates. Around the globe, millions are counting the days until a Covid-19 vaccine is discovered. These people, however, were protesting for the right not to be inoculated – and they weren’t the only ones. Continue reading...