The Guardian hírek

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    World protests and Big Sleep Out: weekend's best photos

    The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world including UK election campaign, World’s Big Sleep Out with Hong Kong and sexual violence protests Continue reading...

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    How can you conquer ordinary, everyday sadness? Think of it as a person

    New research suggests anthropomorphising your emotions can help you control them. But how do you actually go about it? In the Pixar film Inside Out, the emotions of an 11-year-old girl are personified as perky Joy, petulant Disgust and hulking Anger. Sadness – voiced by The American Office’s Phyllis Smith – is, predictably, a downer with a deep side-parting and a chunky knit. Amy Poehler’s Joy can hardly stand to be around her, like a colleague you would time your trips to the tea point to avoid. But the takeaway of the 2015 film – said by Variety to “for ever change the way people think about the way people think” – was that both emotions were necessary, and Sadness was as valid a part of life as Joy. Now there is a case for not only accepting Sadness, as in Inside Out – but embodying her, too. Researchers from Hong Kong and Texas recently found that individuals asked to think of their sadness as a person reported feeling less sad afterwards, a result they attributed to the increased distance perceived between the self and the emotion. Continue reading...

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    Beth England’s goal helps unbeaten Chelsea overcome Manchester City

    A first goal in a Chelsea shirt against Manchester City from Beth England and her assist for a Maren Mjelde second, helped the Blues come from behind to earn their first Women’s Super League win against their title rivals in five years. The Women’s Super League may be increasingly competitive but Arsenal, City and Chelsea are still stretching their legs at the top. As a result, the head-to-heads between the two teams matter more. Continue reading...

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    Aston Villa v Leicester City: Premier League – live!

    Live updates from Villa Park, kick-off 2pm (GMT) Rodgers’ reborn Leicester should not be overlooked in title race Feel free to email Will or tweet @Will_Unwin 2.35pm GMT 34 mins: Chilwell sends a cross over everyone and it is picked up on the opposite flank by Pereira, who is quickly flattened by Targett. Elsewhere, Tettey has put Norwich 1-0 up against Sheffield United. 2.33pm GMT 32 mins: Pereira takes down Douglas Luiz on the left touchline and the subsequent free-kick looks dangerous but is flicked clear by a defender. Vardy once again gets the other side of the defence to catch a through ball, he drives into the box and looks to lay it off to an onrushing Iheanacho but Engels slides in to divert it back to Heaton, removing the danger in the process. Continue reading...

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    Ruiz sows seeds of destruction and Joshua reaps the benefit

    Overweight defending champion pays price for his partying and lack of pre-fight discipline as British fighter regains the WBA, IBF, WBO and IBO belts he lost in New YorkMaybe Anthony Joshua would have always won Saturday night’s rematch. Maybe the taller, fitter man’s physical advantages in height (four inches) and reach (eight inches) would have always been enough when paired with a controlled, disciplined gameplan executed to perfection. But there’s thinking and there’s knowing. And Andy Ruiz Jr will never know how it might have been different if he had approached the task with the seriousness of purpose it demanded. Continue reading...

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    Rangers v Celtic: Scottish League Cup final – live!

    Live updates as the Old Firm rivals meet at Hampden Park Ewan Murray: Celtic fans fear the threat of Gerrard’s Rangers Get in touch! Email Simon or tweet him 2.22pm GMT Weather latest: it is absolutely ratting down in Glasgow. The pitch is “absolutely saturated” and it’s unlikely to stop any time soon. 2.15pm GMT It’s probably wise to establish at this stage what would happen should the scores be level after 90 minutes. Here are the relevant regulations: Basis of Competition 4.5 In all rounds, other than the First Round, the Competition shall be conducted on a ‘knockout’ basis with the winner being the Club or club with the greater number of goals at full-time. If the scores are equal at full time or no goals have been scored, an extra thirty minutes (15 minutes each way) of extra time will be played (“Extra Time”) and, if the scores are still equal or still no goals have been scored at the end of Extra Time, the winner shall be determined by taking Penalty Kicks. Continue reading...

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    France to press ahead with pensions reform despite protests

    Train and metro strikes enter fourth day as prime minister vows to implement changes The French government said it would press ahead with its planned pension changes but said the proposed new system that has sparked nationwide strikes would be introduced gradually and public concerns would be addressed. Transport systems were paralysed for a fourth day on Sunday as unions at the state railway SNCF and Paris public transport system RATP extended their strike against the changes. Continue reading...

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    WTO faces crisis over settlement disputes unless Trump backs off

    Ability to police global trade could be neutered by battle to safeguard US sovereignty The World Trade Organization is set to plunge into the biggest crisis in its 25-year history later this week as the climax to a long-running and bitter dispute means the Geneva-based body will cease to be able to settle disputes between its member states. Unless Donald Trump backs off at the last minute and agrees to a peace plan, Washington’s protracted battle to safeguard US sovereignty will lead to the neutering of the WTO’s ability to police global trade. Continue reading...

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    Chelsea v Manchester City: Women's Super League – live!

    Updates from the 12pm GMT kick-off 100 best female players: who is our No 1? Email Ben or tweet @benfisherj 12.35pm GMT 33 min: Emma Hayes can be heard barking instructions from the touchline. In short she wants her Chelsea side to press City higher and, in effect, into trouble. City have had it all their own way since an unflattering opening period. Janine Beckie is causing problems down the Chelsea left. 12.34pm GMT 31 min: Scott pings a cross towards the back post in search of Lauren Hemp. The ball lures Berger miles out of her goal but a combination of the Chelsea goalkeeper and the defender Mjelde end up scaring City off. But not for long as Stokes rebuilds down the left, though City again fail to test Berger. Continue reading...

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    Saturday Night Live: James Corden as a Mean Girls Boris – and J-Lo as herself, repeatedly

    We get it: Jennifer Lopez is hot. It’s more controversial, though no funnier, to show Trump in a weirdly sympathetic light We open in the Nato cafeteria, where the “cool kids” – Justin Trudeau (Jimmy Fallon), Emmanuel Marcon (Paul Rudd) and dumpy hanger-on Boris Johnson (James Corden) – tease and ostracize Donald Trump (Alec Baldwin). Related: Saturday Night Live: Will Ferrell warms up after coldest cold open Continue reading...

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    Economic conditions favour the left, so why is Labour not expected to win with ease?

    Tories take nothing for granted because rival plans resonate with voters and polls could be wrong Even now it is impossible to call the election. Sure, the polls look pretty conclusive but the margin between victory and defeat is slender. The last two elections sprung last-minute surprises and when the Tories say they are taking nothing for granted they are telling the truth. The reason for that is simple: the Conservatives may have had a clear message on Brexit that has resonated with leave voters but they also know that much of what Labour has been saying during the election campaign resonates with the voters. Boris Johnson has been battling against an ideological headwind. Continue reading...

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    'The job is to be there for people': what is Miss World in 2019?

    The beauty contest was a symbol of hate and division for feminists in the 1970s. Now Miss World is on a humanitarian charm offensive When I arrive at the Miss World hotel at Tower Bridge, London, the contestants are sharing the hotel with an insurance claims and fraud summit. The cognitive dissonance is amazing. Young women in blue spangled sashes – Miss This and Miss That – loiter at the check-in desk and mingle with insurance executives, who are as grey as you could imagine. They are two flocks of birds: pigeons and peacocks; and the pigeons stare at the peacocks not with lust, but with awe. I am here because when I was a child I loved Miss World. It was like contemplating a doll’s house I would never be admitted to – and that was fine. I think I knew it, even then, that such beauty is a complex gift. Even so, I used to watch it with my mother and wonder which, of all of them, was the most beautiful. Then I grew up, became a second-wave feminist and felt queasily guilty, for the Miss World of that era is now remembered as the very definition of objectification. Continue reading...

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    Josep Borrell: can EU’s new diplomat- in-chief strengthen bloc’s global standing?

    The veteran Spanish socialist has a reputation for plain speaking, and a brief to build a more assertive EU It has been called Europe’s “valley of tears”. But it isn’t in National Geographic; rather it is the monthly pilgrimage of the European Union’s 28 foreign ministers to Brussels or Luxembourg to discuss the woes of the world. And the man who coined the phrase, Josep Borrell, a socialist veteran of Spanish politics, was not paying a compliment. He described the EU foreign affairs council as “more a valley of tears than a centre of decision-making” because “it’s where all the open sores of humanity come. They tell us their sufferings, we express our condolences and concern … but no capacity for action comes out of it and we just move on to the next one.” Continue reading...

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    Man arrested over alleged racist abuse in Manchester derby

    • FA also announces investigation into incident at Etihad Stadium• 41-year-old arrested on suspicion of ‘racially aggravated’ offenceA man has been arrested in connection with the allegations of racist abuse by a supporter during Saturday’s Manchester derby. The news comes after a video circulating on social media appeared to show a Manchester City fan making monkey chants towards Manchester United players during the second half of the match. Greater Manchester police announced on Sunday morning that a 41-year-old man had been arrested on suspicion of a racially aggravated public order offence and remains in custody for questioning. Continue reading...

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    Labour antisemitism row may affect election result, says McDonnell

    Shadow chancellor says sorry to Jewish community, adding party was ‘doing everything possible’ to tackle issue Latest election news – live updates The shadow chancellor has expressed his concern that the row over antisemitism in Labour may have an effect on the election result, adding that the party had “done everything we can possibly do” to tackle the problem. In a BBC One interview on Sunday morning, John McDonnell apologised to the Jewish community for “the suffering we’ve inflicted on them”. He added: “I say to them, we’re doing everything possible and we are going to learn more lessons and we want to be the shining example of anti-racism that the Labour party should be.” Continue reading...

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    Hong Kong democracy protests continue into seventh month

    Sea of protesters pour on to streets calling for elections and inquiry into police tactics Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators have once again poured on to the streets of Hong Kong, their chants echoing off high-rise buildings, in a mass show of support for a protest movement that shows no signs of flagging as it enters a seventh month. Chanting “Fight for freedom” and “Stand with Hong Kong”, a sea of protesters formed a mile-long human snake winding for blocks on Hong Kong Island, from the Causeway Bay shopping district to the Central business zone. Continue reading...

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    App helps Inuit hunters navigate thinning sea ice in Canadian Arctic

    Siku app aims draw on traditional knowledge ‘We copying what our parents used to do, but in modern ways’ A new mobile phone app has been devised to help Inuit hunters in the Canadian north avoid an increasingly dangerous effect of climate change: unpredictable sea ice. Developed under the guidance of the Arctic Eider Society, the app aims to draw on the catalogue of traditional knowledge that has helped Inuit thrive in an unforgiving region. Continue reading...

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    Ukraine's new president comes face to face with Putin in Paris

    Volodymyr Zelenskiy to meet Russian counterpart at summit on Kyiv’s five-year war with Russian separatists The Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, faces a major test at a high-stakes summit with Vladimir Putin in Paris as he pursues a campaign promise to negotiate an end to the war in south-east Ukraine despite vocal opposition at home. Zelenskiy and his Russian counterpart will meet at the Élysée Palace on Monday alongside European leaders for their first face-to-face talks since the comedian-turned-president took office in May. Continue reading...

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    Nobel peace prize winner Abiy Ahmed embroiled in media row

    Officials say winner’s refusal to face public questioning is ‘highly problematic’ Abiy Ahmed, the prime minister of Ethiopia, has come under pressure to appear before the media in Oslo this week when he collects the Nobel peace prize on Tuesday. Senior officials of the Norwegian Nobel Institute have said the 2019 winner’s refusal to attend any event where he could be asked questions publicly is “highly problematic”. Continue reading...

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    Austria struggles with marauding Krampus demons gone rogue

    Police record rising violence and drunkenness in traditional folkloric festivities Goat-horned half-demons with scraggy coats of fur, lolling tongues and threatening bundles of birch branches are no one’s idea of a welcome guest on a winter’s night. In Austria, however, the figure of the Krampus has been part of pre-Christmas folklore for centuries, with men in costumes roaming the streets to scare children and grown-ups from the end of November to the middle of December. Continue reading...

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    Fit for stardom: How Adam Driver went from US Marine to Hollywood heartthrob

    With Oscar and Tony nominations and three new films, the much sought-after actor has now hit superstar status Few actors could be said to have dominated a year as much as Adam Driver. The 36-year-old began 2019 with a best supporting actor Oscar nomination for BlacKkKlansman and will end it as the star of three of the year’s most talked-about movies – The Report, Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker and Marriage Story. In the months between, he has won rave reviews for his performance in Burn This on Broadway, earning a Tony nomination (he missed out to Bryan Cranston), and been the focus of a series of adoring profiles. An article in the New Yorker alluding to Girls, the TV show that made Driver’s name, branded him the “Original Man”. Continue reading...

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    Street scenes: George Georgiou’s images of spectators at US parades

    The British photographer’s new book picturing onlookers at events across the US in 2016 sheds an unexpected light on the fractured nature of contemporary American lifeWhen the American photographer William Klein shot the Macy’s Thanksgiving parade in New York in the 1950s, he evoked the collective energy of the event in the blurred shapes of inflatables floating above the crowds and closeups of the faces of people watching from the sidewalk. In these images, all is blur and movement, an impressionistic glimpse of a parade that drew thousands of onlookers from the outer boroughs and beyond. More than 60 years later, in 2016, the year of Donald Trump’s election, British photographer George Georgiou travelled across a very different United States, his itinerary dictated by parades, both national and local. He too photographed the Macy’s Thanksgiving parade, but also many lesser-known annual gatherings such as the Mermaid parade in Coney Island, the Cranberry festival parade in Warrens, Wisconsin, and Marion County Country Ham Days Pigasus parade in Lebanon, Kentucky. From the off, his plan was not to capture the spectacle of the parades themselves but rather the more intimate theatre of the people lining the streets. “I set out with no big agenda,” he says, “but I knew the images would somehow speak volumes about contemporary America.” That they do, in ways both expected and surprising. Continue reading...

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    Boris Johnson admits there will be some customs checks after Brexit

    PM insists they will apply only to items from Great Britain destined for Irish Republic Latest election news - live updates Boris Johnson has admitted there will be some customs checks for goods crossing the Irish Sea after Brexit but he insisted they would apply only to items destined for the Republic of Ireland. In an interview on Sky News on Sunday morning, the prime minister promised “there won’t be checks” despite warnings to the contrary in leaked Treasury documents. Continue reading...

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    Aung San Suu Kyi heads to Hague for Myanmar genocide showdown

    Peace prize winner will lead her country’s defence against claims at court in Netherlands A momentous legal confrontation will take place at the UN’s highest court this week when the Nobel peace prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi appears in person to defend Myanmar against accusations of genocide. Once internationally feted as a human rights champion, Myanmar’s state counsellor is scheduled to lead a delegation to the international court of justice (ICJ) in The Hague. Continue reading...

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    General election: Johnson refuses to say if he'll resign should Tories lose – live news

    Follow events on the last Sunday of the campaign as Boris Johnson is due to be interviewed on Sky and calls grow for tactical voting to topple him as prime minister 9.26am GMT Q: Why did three Brexit party MEPs defect to the Tories? Look at Annunziata Rees-Mogg’s class, she is a Conservative. 9.22am GMT Q: Why is support for the Brexit party dropping? We have a chance of getting a “handful” of seats, Farage says. But he admits the party’s support could be split. Continue reading...

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    British Isis captives ‘could be handed over to Assad’

    Human rights groups fear change of stance by Foreign Office might lead to executionsFears are growing that the Foreign Office has paved the way for British Islamic State captives held in Syria to be handed over to the regime of President Bashar al-Assad, which is accused of war crimes including mass torture and executions. Human rights groups argue that, as they face pressure to repatriate Britons detainedin Syria, ministers’ inaction may result in the transfer of UK nationals to Assad’s forces. Continue reading...

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    Tigers, elephants and pangolins suffer as global wildlife trafficking soars

    Dozens of species are now at risk but a conference this week will showcase new technology that could help stop the illegal trade The two young women who arrived at Heathrow in February 2014 en route to Düsseldorf were carrying nondescript luggage. Customs officers were suspicious nevertheless and looked inside – to find 13 iguanas stuffed into socks inside the cases. Astonishingly, 12 of the highly endangered San Salvador rock iguanas had survived their transatlantic journey. “There only about 600 of these animals left in the wild, in the Bahamas, and these animals were being taken to a private collector somewhere in Germany. Incredibly, we were able to return 12 of them, alive, to their homeland – on San Salvador island,” said Grant Miller, who was then working for the Border Force’s endangered species team. Continue reading...

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    Super rich versus the rest: Champions League groups hampered by inequality | Jonathan Wilson

    Despite the efforts of Dinamo Zagreb, Club Brugge, Slavia Prague and Olympiakos, group stages are still all too predictableWhat have we done to deserve this? The last round of Champions League group fixtures is on us and only half the qualifiers are already known. There will actually be something to play for, intrigue on both nights, which is rare enough by this stage. Football is spoiling us. Liverpool, the holders, could conceivably go out. There’s a head-to-head showdown between Shakhtar Donetsk and Atalanta. There are complicated permutations to determine which two of Chelsea, Ajax and Valencia go through. It has been a better group stage than most. And yet it remains easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for an outsider to reach the last 16 of the Champions League. Continue reading...

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    Christmas starter: a vegan recipe for kimchi and tofu dumplings | Meera Sodha

    Not conventional, but definitely fun to make and to eat, these gyoza-style dumplings make a terrific festive curtain-raiser The truth about Christmas past is that the vegan was often sent to the Siberian end of the dining table with a nut roast for one. Happily, we’re in 2019 and it doesn’t have to be this way any more. These bold but comforting little dumplings are the perfect way to cut the ribbon on the Christmas meal, and are something that the whole family can both help to make and eat together. Christmas, after all, is about sharing – well, until it comes to the last dumpling, at least. Continue reading...

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    Rough sex and rough justice: we need a greater understanding of consent

    Troubling issues of consent and pleasure – and the role of pornography – need to be approached more critically and more explicitly I’m wary of writing about sex and porn for many reasons, the first being it’s rude. And as an upright suburban mother with two pairs of Uggs and a self-imposed curfew of 10pm, it is surely more appropriate for me to be exploring such topics as ideas for leftover porridge and the best heated clothes airers than, for eg, the ethics of violent porn. The second reason is that writing about sex and porn is a delicate journey that often veers off-road into bushes of politics and shaming, the latter being something I’m keen to avoid – I very much respect sex-people, their creativity, their energy, their playful ways with a brush. Continue reading...

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    'Bhopal’s tragedy has not stopped': the urban disaster still claiming lives 35 years on

    The Union Carbide factory explosion remains the world’s worst industrial accident – but as its dreadful legacy becomes increasingly apparent, victims are still waiting for justice The residents of JP Nagar have no way to escape their ghosts. This ramshackle neighbourhood, on the outskirts of the Indian city of Bhopal, stands just metres away from the chemical factory which exploded just after midnight on 2 December 1984 and seeped poison into their lives forever. The blackened ruins of the Union Carbide plant still loom untouched behind the factory walls. Related: The Bhopal disaster victims still waiting for justice 35 years on – in pictures Continue reading...

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    A-Z of climate anxiety: how to avoid meltdown

    With the climate emergency putting our mental health at risk, Emma Beddington presents an everyday guide to eco wellbeing Much like the planet, people have a tipping point. Mine came last summer, when a respected scientist told me matter-of-factly that he thought it was “at least highly unlikely” that his teenage children would survive beyond late middle age. At that point, three decades of climate unease crystallised into debilitating dread, and I’m far from alone. Continue reading...

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    No trains and no compromise as France faces a winter of discontent

    With hardline unions threatening indefinite strikes over pension reforms, there is apprehension at the political perils facing Emmanuel Macron Emmanuel Macron will seek to placate angry strikers this week while honouring his election pledge to shake up France’s pension system in a delicate balancing act that will define his political future. Ministers are looking at possible concessions that could defuse the strikes and protests that have paralysed the country since last week. Continue reading...

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    Macron wants not just reform but to change the way France thinks | John Lichfield

    Any other president might choose to leave the Kafkaesque pensions system alone ahead of the 2022 elections Pensions reform in France is like the rumbustious games of proto-football played by whole towns in England and Scotland of the past. At regular intervals – most recently in 1993, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2010 – the French government competes against a large part of the country’s population. After days or weeks of confused conflict the two teams retire, exhausted. Small concessions of ground are made. No clear goals are scored by either side. The only exception was 1995 when the France v Jacques Chirac and Alain Juppé game went into prolonged extra time (three weeks of transport strikes) before the government caved in more or less completely. A rare, undisputed goal for “the people”. Continue reading...

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    Gene editing will let us control our very evolution. Will we use it wisely? | Dan Rather

    I’ve covered some of the biggest stories of our age, but this is the biggest and could change what it means to be human We live in a time when science and technology are having an impact on our society in more and more ways. And the decisions that shape how these new fields of knowledge develop ultimately affect all of us. Related: Human Nature review – quiet revolution that began in a yoghurt pot Continue reading...

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    Ordinary Love review – Manville and Neeson excel in joyous heartbreaker

    Lesley Manville and Liam Neeson are note-perfect as an everyday couple coping with cancer in this singular drama with universal appeal There’s nothing ordinary about this deeply moving, frequently funny and piercingly insightful drama from Belfast playwright Owen McCafferty, making his screenwriting feature debut. On the surface it’s a tale of a middle-aged couple facing up to a diagnosis of breast cancer, and a year of medical intervention. Yet beyond this immediate diagnosis is something far more rich and compelling – a story of everyday love between two people living in the shadow of grief, facing an uncertain future, both together and apart. Directed with wit, subtlety and great emotional honesty by Lisa Barros D’Sa and Glenn Leyburn (the co-directors of 2012’s brilliantly life-affirming Good Vibrations), it’s a singular story with universal appeal – striking a very personal chord with some viewers while finding common ground with the widest possible audience. I’ve seen it three times so far, and found it more joyous, heart-breaking and ultimately uplifting with each subsequent viewing. Continue reading...

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    Back to the border of misery: Amexica revisited 10 years on

    A decade after publishing his vivid account of the places and people most affected by the US-Mexican ‘war on drugs’, Ed Vulliamy returns to the frontline to see how life has changedIf you drink the water in Ciudad Juárez, there you’ll stay, goes the saying – Se toma agua de Juárez, allí se queda. It’s not a reference to the quality of drinking water (about which polemic abounds because it is so dirty) but to the beguiling lure of this dusty and dangerous yet strong and charismatic city. It’s a dictum that might be applied to the whole 2,000-mile Mexico-US borderland of which Juárez and its sister city on the US side, El Paso, form the fulcrum. Ten years ago, I returned from several months’ immersion along that frontier, reporting on a narco-cartel war for this newspaper and eventually writing a book, Amexica, about the terrain astride the border, land that has a single identity – that belongs to both countries and yet to neither. A frontier at once porous and harsh: across which communities live and a million people traverse every day, legally, as do hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of goods annually. Continue reading...

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    Another week of violence that brings shame on all India | Kenan Malik

    Justice isn’t served by allowing the police to kill suspected rapists A 23-year-old rape victim, on the way to a court hearing, is doused in kerosene and set alight. She dies in hospital with 95% burns. Four men accused of the brutal gang rape of a young vet in Hyderabad are shot dead by police, supposedly after they tried to escape. The two incidents sum up the horrors of rape and of police extrajudicial killings in India. Violence against women has become a volatile issue in the country. Government figures show that 33,658 cases of rape were reported to the police in 2017, an average of 92 rapes every day. Continue reading...

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    Iran unveils 'budget of resistance' to sanctions with help from $5bn Russian loan

    Iran’s president says his country will depend less on oil revenue in a budget designed to resist crippling US sanctions Iran’s president says his country will depend less on oil revenue next year, in a “budget of resistance” that will partly depend on a $5bn Russian loan. Speaking during Sunday’s opening session of parliament, Hassan Rouhani said: “The budget is based on maximum pressure and sanctions. Continue reading...

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    Deep and crisp and vegan: now meat-free festive fare goes exotic

    For years, a plant-based diet was seen as dull. But as more and more people embrace it, food stores are upping their gameWhen Tony Bishop-Weston turned vegan 25 years ago, Christmas dinner was a challenge. “I thought I’d do a moussaka, as there were 14 of us,” he said. “I got the last aubergine in the village – there was only one. And that was a bit wrinkly.” Everything has changed since then, especially this year, thanks to the flexitarian boom. Vegans who once relied on ingenuity and Linda McCartney’s sausages can now pick from a cornucopia of Christmas treats, because half the UK population is cutting back on meat or giving it up, according to market analysts Mintel. Continue reading...

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    ‘Cosy stitch-up’ by Farage and Tories makes it hard for us to win, says Jo Swinson

    Lib Dem leader attacks Brexit party’s move to stand down in some seats but still hopes for gainsThe Brexit party’s decision to stand aside for the Tories in hundreds of seats curtailed the electoral ambitions of the Liberal Democrats, its leader Jo Swinson has said. In an interview with the Observer, Swinson said that her party’s strategy had been affected by a “cosy stitch-up” that saw Nigel Farage’s party stand down in Tory-held seats. She said the party was now concentrating on “dozens of byelections across the country” that could still deliver new Lib Dem MPs and topple some big-name Conservatives on election night. She also predicted that Johnson would be toppled as Tory leader should he fail to win a majority. Continue reading...

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    Donald Trump has destroyed American leadership – I'll restore it | Elizabeth Warren

    The president’s behavior at the Nato summit in London was as appalling as it was typical. Our next commander-in-chief will have important work to do For seven decades, America’s strength, security and prosperity have been underpinned by our unmatched network of treaty alliances, cemented in shared democratic values and a recognition of our common security. But after three years of Donald Trump’s insults and antics, our alliances are under enormous strain. Related: Joe Biden's old-guy machismo is a serious flaw – but also what voters love about him | Ross Barkan Continue reading...

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    Kochland review: how the Kochs bought America – and trashed it

    Christopher Leonard has produced a relentless accounting of the brothers grim which somehow concludes with sympathy If the unbridled consumption of fossil fuels is indeed pushing the planet faster and faster toward Armageddon, Charles Koch probably deserves as much credit as anyone for the end of the world as we know it. Related: Dark Money review: Nazi oil, the Koch brothers and a rightwing revolution Continue reading...

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    Brace yourself, the flood of lies in this election is about to become a torrent | Nick Cohen

    Democracy is subverted when politicians abuse their own failure to pass strict campaigning laws If Britain’s politicians believed in defending democracy, there would not be an election on Thursday. Our leaders would have held back until laws controlling propaganda and foreign subversion were in place. They haven’t waited, because they don’t want to protect the integrity of the ballot. With wolfish smiles, they have welcomed the opportunities for spreading fake news that the web has brought them. As the paper was going to press, the final online advertising blitz had begun. Full Fact, the campaign group that fights the necessary battle to keep public life clean, was monitoring online adverts from the Conservatives saying that the cost of a Corbyn government will be £1.2tn – a figure based on assumptions that are dubious to the point of fatuity – and promising to recruit 50,000 new nurses – a straight lie. Labour was claiming that a Tory trade deal with the US would increase NHS costs by £500m a week – a statement that is as good as a lie, as there is no trade deal to cost – and merrily chirruping that 95% of people won’t have to pay more tax to fund its dazzling spending spree, which, as the Institute of Fiscal Studies points out, isn’t true either. Continue reading...

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    The best graphic novels of 2019

    A heartbreaking wartime tale of a Korean ‘comfort woman’ stands out in an excellent year in which stalwarts Seth and Chris Ware continued to expand the horizons of the form This would have been an extraordinary year for graphic novels even had no other comics save for Seth’s Clyde Fans (Drawn & Quarterly) and Chris Ware’s Rusty Brown (Jonathan Cape) been published. Seth’s book is a history of mid-century capitalism disguised as the story of two elderly brothers; Ware’s uses a single day in a Nebraska high school in the 1970s to tell, in characteristically frown-inducing manner, a host of very human stories. Both are utterly amazing; both push the form in new directions. That said, even without them it would have been an exceptional 12 months. I could write a piece three times as long as this and still have to leave out several favourites. I loved – and reviewed – the following: Sensible Footwear (Myriad), Kate Charlesworth’s vital and joyful history of British LGBTQ life; Sunday’s Child (Jonathan Cape), in which Serena Katt pieces together with exquisite tact the story of what her Polish-German father did in the war; Maggy Garrisson (SelfMadeHero), an intricately plotted collection of stories about a female London gumshoe by Lewis Trondheim and Stéphane Oiry; and Off Season, James Sturm’s spare and strangely affecting book about a canine builder who finds himself estranged from his wife and politics in Trump’s America. And I can say, without hesitation, that all four of them would make fantastic Christmas presents. Continue reading...

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    John Legend: 'The key to happiness is to open your mind to love'

    A phenomenally successful singer-songwriter and social justice campaigner, or a preachy virtue-signaller? Ryan Bradley meets John Legend John Legend springs up from his mahogany grand piano in the high-ceilinged, light-drenched living room of his Hollywood home and greets me with a grin, a hello, and one of those very smooth handshakes that seamlessly morph into an extremely brief hug. My palms are sweaty and my face is flushed. Until a moment ago, I’d been running up the road that leads to Legend’s hilltop house, late because of the traffic. And now I’m sweatily, awkwardly apologising to John Legend in his beautiful living room as he gestures towards another room where there’s a long table by the window that overlooks the morning haze and the distant ridges of the Santa Monica mountains. “Let’s just zen out in this zen dining room,” John Legend says, before looking around the room as if for the first time, running his hands over the dark-wood table, leaning back in his chair, lifting his head. He inhales, exhales, beams. And then he laughs – a long, deep, rich baritone. The laugh alone is like a song. And the traffic? What traffic? We are in Legend-land. Troubles are distant memories. Continue reading...

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    Mix it up with watercolours for your eyes | Funmi Fetto

    Go painterly with a melange of bright colours – but don’t overdo it Stick to the confines of traditional makeup and you’ll get stuck in a rut. Hence this ethereal look, from Dundas AW19 Couture, appeals. Agreed, it is left of centre but, surprisingly, this painterly melange of watercolour brights – aka a splash of colour in all the wrong places – can actually be wearable. Just take note of the following… With the exception of a cream blush and a touch of highlighter, keep skin bare. Applying eyeshadow with a light hand and damp brush achieves that delicate wash. Unless you want the Scary Hot Mess look, don’t be tempted to add a million colours. Continue reading...

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    Sorry, Timbers, this is not the way to aplogise to the missus | Barbara Ellen

    Justin Timberlake, caught holding hands with another woman, leaps to Instagram to say sorry – and slip in a plug for his new film How wonderfully modern that Justin Timberlake took to Instagram to apologise to his wife, Jessica Biel. After being snapped looking inebriated on a balcony, holding hands with his Palmer co-star Alisha Wainwright, Timberlake began his Insta-soz post saying: “I stay away from gossip as much as I can.” Of course you do, you marvellous, honourable man! Timbers continued: “A few weeks ago I displayed a strong lapse of judgment – but let me clear – nothing happened with my co-star… I drank way too much that night and I regret my behaviour… I apologise to my amazing wife and family… I am focused on being the best husband and father I can be…” Blah blah, yak yak. Continue reading...

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    My friends bore me | Dear Mariella

    Perhaps it’s time for you to seek out new friends, says Mariella Frostrup – your old ones may be relieved The dilemma I’m 32, have a fulfilling job, a wonderful partner and child, and travel a lot. Unfortunately, quite a few of my close friends bore me to death. They haven’t developed personally and intellectually over the last decade. They have no, or limited, ambitions and are the opposite of inspiring. Meeting up with them feels like a chore and I don’t respect many of their opinions. I often wonder whether we have grown incompatible because we are from different class backgrounds, as horrible as that sounds. My friends lack drive, curiosity and resilience, and I’m often embarrassed by how uneducated and bad with money they are. I have tried over and over again to get them to develop an interest in further education, reading, the arts, different cultures, politics and finance, to very little avail. I’m immensely frustrated. On the other hand, they have been loyal and supportive, and breaking up with them because our lives have little common ground strikes me as cruel. Mariella replies Perhaps they’d welcome it? Allowing for their challenged intellects they can’t be unaware of your feelings. Even if you are wholly insincere and brilliant at feigning false interest they must have sensed your frustration towards them and their low expectations. The rolling of eyes and raising of eyebrows at the immensity of their cultural ignorance will have been hard to miss. Hopefully they’re equally unenamoured of you lecturing them about their lowly ambitions and the glories of aspiration and artistic expression. Continue reading...

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    Trump is the natural consequence of our anti-democracy decade | Robert Reich

    The president knows how the system works: the rich give money and get what they want in return. His defeat is imperative We’re coming to the end of what might be called the anti-democracy decade. It began on 21 January 2010 with the supreme court’s shameful decision in Citizens United vs Federal Election Commission, opening the floodgates to big money in politics with the absurd claim that the first amendment protects corporate speech. Related: Nancy Pelosi is bungling the impeachment inquiry into Trump | Moira Donegan Continue reading...

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    Australia fires: heatwave forecast amid calls for emergency meeting

    Conditions ease but Labor urges emergency Coag meeting before extreme heat in NSW and Victoria Firefighters have taken advantage of less extreme conditions to try to contain blazes burning across New South Wales ahead of worsening conditions and soaring temperatures expected on Tuesday. More than 100 fires were still burning across the state on Sunday, including the massive Gospers Mountain blaze, which is expected to burn for weeks. Continue reading...

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    Delhi fire: at least 34 dead in 'horrific' factory blaze

    Victims were mostly labourers and factory workers sleeping in a building in Delhi’s old quarter At least 34 people have died in a major fire that broke out in a building in a grains market in central New Delhi, a doctor in a government-run hospital said. Kishore Singh said the victims were brought to the hospital by rescuers on Sunday. Another 15 people were being treated for burns or smoke inhalation. They were in a stable condition, Singh said. Continue reading...

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    North Korea claims success in 'very important' test at satellite launch site

    State media says test will change regime’s ‘strategic position’ amid further tensions with the US over its nuclear ambitions North Korea has reportedly carried out a “very important” test at its Sohae satellite launch site, a rocket testing ground that US officials once said North Korea had promised to close. The test, reported by state news agency KCNA, comes as North Korea has warned it could take a “new path” amid stalled denuclearisation talks with the US and as its year-end deadline nears. Continue reading...

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    New Zealand storms: tornado warning issued as floods cut off towns

    North Island braces for severe storms after landslides and flooding cut communications and close roads in South Island We are expanding our coverage of New Zealand. Please help us by supporting our independent journalism New Zealand has been hit by a weekend of extreme weather, with landslides and flooding in the South Island cutting off towns and trapping tourists, and forecasters warning the North Island of tornadoes. The Met Service said central and western areas in the North Island could expect severe thunderstorms on Sunday, with downpours of 25mm to 40mm an hour, large hail and possible '“small tornadoes”. Continue reading...

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    Banana artwork that fetched $120,000 is eaten by 'hungry' artist

    Performance artist consumes masterpiece in front of crowd at Art Basel in Miami, but ‘the idea’ apparently lives on An artwork that sold last week for $120,000 and was hailed as “a symbol of global trade” has been eaten, in what might seem a fitting end for something that was an ever-ripening banana duct-taped to a wall. The piece, titled Comedian, by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan was on show at the international gallery Perrotin at Art Basel in Miami when New York performance artist David Datuna ate it, saying he was hungry. Continue reading...

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    US business leaders in Hong Kong detained and denied entry to Macau

    President and chairman of American Chamber of Commerce told to sign statement saying decision not to enter Macau was voluntary The chairman and president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong were separately denied entry to the neighbouring Chinese-ruled city of Macau after being detained by immigration officials. Chairman Robert Grieves and president Tara Joseph were travelling to the former Portuguese colony for the chamber’s annual Macau ball on Saturday. They said authorities did not provide a reason for refusing them entry. Continue reading...

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    Amazon indigenous leaders killed in Brazil drive-by shooting

    Gunmen opened fire on a group from the Guajajara tribe on a highway in Maranhão state, killing two and wounding others Two indigenous leaders have been shot dead and two others wounded in Brazil’s Maranhão state, in an attack not far from where a prominent tribesman who defended the Amazon rainforest was killed last month, authorities said. The attack on the members of the Guajajara tribe, which is known for the forest guardians who protect their territory against illegal deforestation, occurred on the margins of a federal highway near El-Betel village in the country’s north-east on Saturday. Continue reading...

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    Bob Hawke’s daughter says he told her not to pursue rape allegations against former Labor MP

    Rosslyn Dillon made allegations as part of legal challenge against her father’s estate Former prime minister Bob Hawke’s youngest daughter says she was raped by a confidant of her father in the 1980s – but was urged not to report the assaults to protect Hawke’s leadership ambitions. In claims published by the New Daily, Rosslyn Dillon levelled the allegations against former Labor Victorian MP Bill Landeryou, who died in February, as part of her legal challenge against her father’s $18m estate. Continue reading...

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    Gary Neville criticises PM after fan accused of racism at Manchester derby

    Commentator said Boris Johnson’s language around immigration fuels racism in society and football Football commentator and pundit Gary Neville blamed Boris Johnson’s election rhetoric on immigrants and immigration for fuelling the number of racist incidents in British society and sport. Neville was speaking after the Manchester derby, which saw United defeat City 2-1. The result, however, was overshadowed by an incident during the second half of the game that appeared to show a City fan making a monkey gesture towards a United player. Continue reading...

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    Job done and better days to come for Anthony Joshua on odd Arabian night

    The Englishman executed his gameplan perfectly in Diriyah to get his career and the heavyweight division back on track The rains came early on Saturday night in Diriyah, lashing down on the 15,000‑seat purpose-built arena on the north‑west outskirts of the Saudi capital. They forced the early arrivers to take cover in the tight concourses, reducing the crowd to pockets of spectators hiding under bin bags scattered across the empty stands. There was a humour, or some might say a hint of cosmic justice, in the skies opening up above a city with one of the world’s lowest annual rainfalls and threatening to spoil the first ever heavyweight championship fight to be staged in the Middle East. A week so dominated by talk of sportswashing was in danger of being washed out. Continue reading...

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    China and Taiwan offered us huge bribes, say Solomon Islands MPs

    Politicians say they were offered hundreds of thousands of dollars for their support before country switched diplomatic recognition to Beijing Solomon Islands politicians allege both China and Taiwan offered bribes of hundreds of thousands of dollars to gain their support during a diplomatic row that rocked the country earlier this year. In September the prime minister of the Solomon Islands, Manasseh Sogavare, formally severed ties with Taipei and established relations with Beijing, ending the country’s 36-year relationship with Taiwan. Continue reading...

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    Anthony Joshua goes the distance to win world titles back from Andy Ruiz Jr

    • British boxer wins on points after much-improved performance• Two judges scored fight 118-110 for Joshua, third called it 119-109On the night when rain and wind spat and scudded across Saudi Arabian desert, Anthony Joshua whipped up a minor storm of his own to win back his WBA, IBF and WBO heavyweight titles from Andy Ruiz Jr. In their first encounter in June, the Mexican-American had been able to disrupt the validity of boxing’s oldest and most indomitable laws – that a good big fighter usually beats a good smaller one – by stopping Joshua in seven. This time the tables were turned as the Briton used his eight-inch reach advantage and improved footwork to much better effect claim a wide points victory. Continue reading...

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    Sick of corruption, Haiti looks back to its revolutionary hero for hope

    As conflict racks the nation and anger at a political scandal grows, Haitians are rallying to the country’s founding father more than 200 years after his assassination On the walls across Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, a stencilled image can be found. Depicting a figure in a Napoleonic-era cocked hat and military frock coat, it first emerged amid the country’s long-running political and security crisis that began last year. The man portrayed is Jean-Jacques Dessalines – Emperor Jacques I of Haiti – the rebel general who defeated French forces at the battle of Vertières to found the state of Haiti in 1804. And it is not only in graffiti that Dessalines’s two centuries-old legacy has been seen in the recent months of political turmoil that has gripped the country. Continue reading...

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    Defiant protesters back in Baghdad square within an hour of slaughter

    Demonstrators grow ever more determined to force real political change in Iraq despite a bloody crackdown which left over 20 dead The gunshots emptied protesters from Baghdad’s Khilani square in minutes, but as nearby streets filled with the crush of people running for their lives, two men stayed on, waving a vast Shia banner in defiance of the bloodshed around them. The pair must have known they were in the gunmen’s crosshairs, and soon one of them crumpled, hit by a bullet. But their determination to continue was a powerful message to authorities and militias trying to crush Iraq’s popular uprising by force. Continue reading...

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    Brendan Rodgers’ reborn Leicester should not be overlooked in title race | Paul Doyle

    Foxes have the ability, squad depth and league-winning experience to snatch the crown if Liverpool wobbleIf Leicester beat Aston Villa on Sunday, it will be the first time they have won eight consecutive matches in the top flight. Winning at Villa Park will not be easy because Dean Smith’s team are better than their position in the Premier League table suggests. But then, so are Brendan Rodgers’s team. Leicester started the weekend as Liverpool’s closest pursuers but still not widely considered to be genuine challengers. Ridiculous. Granted, if the title race remains a sprint, not a marathon, then no one will catch Liverpool this season. But if they slow down or stumble, which is entirely conceivable, then it is not only Manchester City who could overtake them. Leicester are serious runners and could close the gap substantially this month, especially with Liverpool due at the King Power on Boxing Day straight after returning from the World Club Championship in Qatar. Continue reading...

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    Irresistible Rashford delivers on the biggest of stages for United | Barney Ronay

    Is there a better attacking player in England at present than Marcus Rashford, key to Manchester United’s derby win at City?Is there a better attacking player in the country right now than Marcus Rashford? There’s a sentence you wouldn’t have expected to read eight weeks ago. The answer, to be fair, is probably maybe; or may I introduce you to Sadio Mané, Son Heung-min and Jamie Vardy; or better still – never mind that, just enjoy the show. Continue reading...

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    Nobel winner Peter Handke avoids genocide controversy in speech

    Literature laureate accused of supporting Slobodan Milošević gives inaugural lecture The controversial 2019 Nobel literature laureate, Austrian author Peter Handke, gave his inaugural lecture on Saturday night in front of the Swedish Academy and in the face of intense criticism of his selection for the honour. Handke, 77, who is perhaps best known for the novel Wings of Desire, is accused of supporting the genocidal Serbian regime led by Slobodan Milošević and of denying the extent of Serbian terror and killing during the 1990s in the former Yugoslavia. Continue reading...

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    Rashford and Martial give Manchester United derby honours against City

    Manchester City’s hopes of winning the Premier League title for a record-equalling third time in succession had felt slim at kick-off time but does anybody truly think they can overhaul Liverpool after this? It was hard enough for the City support to see their team dismantled by their crosstown rivals, Manchester United, during what amounted to a first-half counter-attacking masterclass – led by Marcus Rashford who, once again, was close to unplayable. But a glance at the table at the end of it all showed that City now trailed Liverpool by 14 points. Continue reading...

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    Calls grow to stop Boris Johnson with tactical voting as race tightens

    11th-hour appeal to anti-Tory voters as poll shows Conservative majority halved A cross-party alliance of opposition politicians has launched an 11th-hour appeal to anti-Tory voters to consider switching allegiance in Thursday’s general election, amid signs that a late surge of tactical voting in a few swing seats could deprive Boris Johnson of a majority in parliament. The calls from senior Labour, Liberal Democrat and SNP figures come as a major poll suggests Johnson’s likely majority has been been cut in half in the last two weeks – from 82 a fortnight ago to just 40 with four days to polling day. Continue reading...

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    Redemption defines a civilised society. We must not forsake the idea | Kenan Malik

    A blame game followed the London Bridge killings. Now it’s time for cool heads to look at deradicalisationCan terrorists be deradicalised? Do all offenders, even those who commit the most abhorrent of crimes, deserve a second chance? Those two key questions remain at the heart of the case of Usman Khan, the London Bridge killer. In the immediate aftermath of the recent terror attack, and against the background of the election campaign, the debate centred largely on operational issues. Boris Johnson made much of the early release of Khan, which he blamed on the last Labour government. Labour highlighted cuts in the prison and probation services, which, it suggested, had led to a failure of rehabilitation and of monitoring. Continue reading...

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    Ron Saunders, title-winning Aston Villa manager, dies aged 87

    • Saunders led Villa to First Division title and two League Cups• Black armbands to be worn for Sunday’s game against Leicester The former Aston Villa manager Ron Saunders has died at the age of 87, the club have announced. Saunders is widely regarded as one of the club’s finest managers, having steered the club to the First Division title in 1980-81. Continue reading...

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    Trump impeachment inquiry: House judiciary committee releases report

    Nadler: constitutional situation is ‘Framers’ worst nightmare’ Trump derides ‘witch hunt’ while boosting US economy Opinion: Nancy Pelosi is bungling the impeachment inquiry The House judiciary committee released a report on the constitutional grounds for impeachment on Saturday. Shortly after that, Donald Trump once again insisted the whole thing was a “witch hunt” against him. Related: White House dismisses invitation to take part in key impeachment hearing Continue reading...

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    A healing corroboree at the foothills of Mount Gulaga, on Yuin country – in pictures

    In Australia, as bushfires raged and drought cracked the land open, there was a stirring. On the New South Wales far south coast, cars carrying elders, children, songmen and women made their way off the dusty road that winds into the Central Tilba football ground. Looking over the gathering was Minga Gulaga (Mother Mountain). According to Yuin story, Gulaga is the sacred birthplace of the Yuin people. Indigenous people all over Australia gathered for a nationwide dance to heal the country. Djiringanj elder Warren Ngarrae Foster said it was perfect timing because Minga Gulaga had been crying. ‘She has called her children back to come together at her feet to heal the spirit and country.’ Continue reading...

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    'Just leave': Delhi, Beijing and Mexico City residents on how to cope with pollution

    As air quality plummets on the Australian east coast as a result of devastating bush fires, residents of cities clogged with smog share their coping strategies The east coast of Australia is in the grip of a bushfire and air pollution crisis. But plummeting air quality levels are a regular occurrence in cities in India, Latin America and China. Here, residents and experts from Delhi, Beijing and Mexico City explain how they survive the smog. Continue reading...

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    The volunteers fighting fires: 'there's always the fear you're not going to come home'

    The New South Wales Rural Fire Service is made up of mechanics, bakers, students, retirees and young parents. They face a dangerous Australian summer Fire warning signs are pinned to thirsty eucalypts every few kilometres on the highway. The paddocks around central west New South Wales look golden from a distance, but are crispy and brown underfoot. Wind has been howling for days, stirring up red dust on the horizon. Severe fire conditions are looming; it’s only the beginning of summer. Continue reading...

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    Anthony Joshua v Andy Ruiz: world heavyweight boxing rematch – live!

    World title rematch in Saudi Arabia, due 9pm GMT Too many heads remain in the sand with hosting of sport And you can email Tom or tweet him @tom_lutz 6.34pm GMT The big news of the last 24 hours, no pun intended, centers on Andy Ruiz’s weight. The champion tipped the scales at 283lbs at yesterday’s weigh-in, 15lbs more than June’s first installment, prompting widespread criticism. In perhaps an ominous historical parallel, that’s the same weight gain Buster Douglas made between his famous upset of Mike Tyson (231lbs) and his doomed first title defense against Evander Holyfield (246lbs). 6.13pm GMT The rain is coming down in sheets outside (and inside) the open-air arena built for tonight’s event. Meanwhile, Croatian prospect Filip Hrgovic has stopped Eric Molina in the third round of their scheduled 12-round scrap, spared from the deluge by the small canopy hanging over the ring. The BBC’s Dan Roan reports that organizers have said there’s no prospect of delay or cancellation despite the watery conditions, but the problems are mounting as the card moves forward. A few of the TV broadcasters on press row have enlisted assistants to shield them from the rain by holding umbrellas over their set-ups, but the umbrellas are obstructing the sightlines of several spectators in the high-rent district, who are understandably kicking off over it. We’re inching toward fiasco territory with the weather at #RuizJoshua2. This is the current view outside Diriyah Arena where the undercard is in full swing. pic.twitter.com/xZubHhKCej Continue reading...

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    Pensacola: suspect reportedly criticized US on social media before shooting

    Three killed before gunman shot at US navy base Saudi airman appeared to have quoted Osama bin Laden The Saudi airman suspected of killing three people at a US navy base in Florida appeared to have posted criticism of US wars and quoted Osama bin Laden on social media hours before opening fire, according to a group that monitors online extremism. Related: Pensacola shooting: Saudi student kills three at Florida naval air station, says official Continue reading...

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    Katrina Karkazis: ‘You can’t use testosterone levels to divide people into male or female’

    The cultural anthropologist on why our view of testosterone as the male sex hormone skews both science and societyKatrina Karkazis, a senior research fellow at Yale University, is a cultural anthropologist working at the intersection of science, technology, gender studies and bioethics. With Rebecca Jordan-Young, a sociomedical scientist, she has written Testosterone: An Unauthorised Biography. It is a critique of both popular and scientific understandings of the hormone, and how they have been used to explain, or even defend, inequalities of power. You suggest that testosterone is understood as an exclusively male hormone, even though it’s also found in women. But surely no scientist believes this. No, what we’re saying is that the hormone has a century-long biography and identity that continues to be that of a male sex hormone. That language is used by authoritative sources in the US like the National Library of Medicine, but also in many media articles. It’s an argument that has to do with how the hormone is understood, which then shapes the kinds of research questions that get asked, what kinds of research get done or not done. There’s actually almost no research on the relationship between testosterone and aggression in women. That is a consequence of the framing of the hormone as having to do with men, masculinity, behaviours understood and framed as masculine. It’s the idea that because men generally have more testosterone, somehow that makes it more relevant in men. But the truth is we know very little about it. Continue reading...

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    Lucy Ellmann: ‘We need to raise the level of discourse’

    The author of the prize-winning Ducks, Newburyport on why she prefers books written before Hiroshima and how an ideal, non-patriarchal world would lookLucy Ellmann is the British-American author of eight novels, including Sweet Desserts and Mimi. Her latest, Ducks, Newburyport, is a 1,000 page, one-sentence stream of consciousness, told from inside the mind of an Ohio mother as she worries about everything from gun control to toilet training, from her weak ankles to white supremacy. It was shortlisted for this year’s Booker prize and won the £10,000 Goldsmiths prize, which goes to a book that “opens up new possibilities for the novel form”. When you first started writing Ducks, Newburyport, did you know it would take the shape that it did?No, it doesn’t work to overplan things. My novels are generated by my preoccupations at the time. The principle I stuck to was simply writing the book I wanted to write. There’s no point in writing anything but that. Continue reading...

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    Christmas book clinic special – our experts’ gift ideas

    Stuck for a literary stocking filler? From medical memoirs to bittersweet romance, short stories to gay histories, our panel of celebrated writers – Andrew Rawnsley, Konnie Huq and Kit de Waal among them – offer their recommendations Anonymous, thirtysomething, south-east England Continue reading...

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    Melania Trump is no caped crusader for women’s rights. She’s still Donald’s fig leaf | Catherine Bennett

    Casting the first lady as a feminist obviously has its attractions. And yet...The spectacle of Melania Trump at the Nato celebrations, inside an outfit that looked half papal, half gobstopper, was not the neatest fit with older, possibly inaccurate perceptions of pallid misery and a mutinous resolve to reserve a separate identity from the old goat she, however inexplicably, married. Consider the handholding. Previously, she was widely admired for a very relatable reluctance to touch Trump – witnessed in the celebrated Tel Aviv hand-swat. Last week, the couple handheld, practically snuggling their way round the summit, or as much as a gigantic poncho ever allows. At an event that exposed, to the largest of audiences, Donald Trump’s more comical deficiencies, his alleged victim appeared all loyalty. Stockholm syndrome? Or could Mrs Trump, hardly a feminist icon from the start, have long been the object of spurious concern, sympathy, wishful thinking? Continue reading...

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    Celtic fans fear Steven Gerrard’s Rangers can end their supremacy | Ewan Murray

    The Liverpool legend has given his side hope and is looking for his first trophy as a manager in the Scottish League Cup finalIt would be natural for Celtic supporters to have spent recent days in a state of apprehension. For the prospect of their domestic dominance being halted by their Old Firm rivals Rangers is galling. Were Aberdeen, Dundee United or Motherwell to end Celtic’s consecutive trophy haul, which currently stands at nine, there would be joy for the underdog and widespread shock. If Rangers break the spell, the mutual impact would be considerable. For all that Celtic should be the favourites heading into Sunday’s Scottish League Cup final, a Hampden Park showpiece – likely to be more intense, and bitter, than most knockout football – supplies no guarantees. This cup competition, often derided as Scotland’s poor relation, has thrown up a first Old Firm final since 2011. That Kilmarnock, St Mirren and Ross County have lifted the trophy during intervening years subtly emphasises the opportunity presented by Rangers’ demise. Yet those in Scottish football high office, sometimes quite blatantly, care little for fairy stories; this is the final they crave. Nonsense such as the sadly inevitable sectarianism will be ignored. Continue reading...

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    Manchester City v Manchester United: Premier League – live!

    Live updates from the 5.30pm GMT game at the Etihad Live scoreboard | Bournemouth 0-3 Liverpool Get in touch! Email Scott with your thoughts 5.40pm GMT 9 min: This match is absurdly entertaining. Rashford slips a ball down the inside left for Lingard, who shoots at Ederson from a tight angle. Ederson kicks away brilliantly in the style popularised by the man between the sticks up the other end. 5.38pm GMT 8 min: Shaw swings a dangerous ball in from the left. Martial manages to handle with both hands in his attempt to chest down and turn on the penalty spot. Continue reading...

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    North Korea says denuclearization off the table in US talks

    Country’s ambassador to the UN said dialogue sought by US was a ‘time-saving trick’ to suit domestic political agenda North Korea’s ambassador to the United Nations said on Saturday denuclearization is already off the negotiating table with the US and lengthy talks with Washington are not needed. Related: I shall taunt you a second time: North Korea threatens Trump ‘dotard’ insults Continue reading...

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    European roundup: Juventus beaten for first time; Gladbach defeat Bayern

    • Lazio 3-1 Juventus• Borussia Mönchengladbach 2-1 Bayern MunichLazio came from behind to beat Juventus 3-1 and hand the Turin side their first defeat of the season on Saturday, scoring the two decisive goals in the final 20 minutes after their opponents had Juan Cuadrado controversially sent off. Juve, who had gone their first 19 games under new coach Maurizio Sarri unbeaten, went ahead with a Cristiano Ronaldo goal in the 25th minute but Luiz Felipe levelled for Lazio in first-half stoppage time. Continue reading...

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    Son Heung-min’s wonder-goal steals show in Spurs’ 5-0 thrashing of Burnley

    It was one of those moments that makes you rub your eyes and shake your head at the same, disbelief and wonder caused by a piece of stunning ingenuity and craft and, for Son Heung-min, the crowing moment of a sensational individual display. He tormented Burnley here and on 32 minutes scored a bona fide contender for goal of the season. It came from nowhere. Well, to be specific, from a Burnley free-kick that Jan Vertonghen managed to hook clear from just inside Tottenham’s area while under pressure from Chris Wood and which he nor anyone else in attendance imaged at the time would turn into an assist. But that is what happened as the ball popped out to the waiting Son and he set off, dribbling and drifting towards glory. Continue reading...

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    The dazzling ceilings of Mumbai's taxis – in pictures

    On her morning commute one day, Mumbai-based journalist Rachel Lopez noticed the ceiling of her taxi was covered in multi-coloured strawberries. “It was ghastly,” she says. “I loved it immediately and wanted to take a shot for fun.” Since then, Lopez has taken more than 500 half-face selfies with the ceiling patterns of Mumbai’s taxis as a backdrop. Continue reading...

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    Luke Evans: ‘I had to drink Charles Dance’s blood’

    The actor and singer on baking with his mum, the joys of a kebab after work and which films have the best on-set catering I remember once spending a Christmas with a friend’s family as our guests and as they arrived the electricity went off in the house. I had to phone the next door neighbour (who’d gone to his parents’ home with his wife and kids) and ask: “Please can I let myself in and cook my turkey in your oven?” In the spirit of things, he said: “Of course.” My very first memory is of Marie biscuits. They were in a green packet, thin and like Rich Tea biscuits but with more writing. We’d always have butter on top. It’s a very Welsh thing, putting butter on your sweet Maries. Continue reading...

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    Without women the novel would die: discuss

    Women are fiction’s life support system – buying 80% of all novels. But as a major new book argues, their love of an emotional truth has been used to trivialise the genre The narrator of Anna Burns’s Booker prize-winning novel, Milkman, likes to read on her way to work, even as she walks. Her preference is 19th-century novels. She likes to retreat to “the safety of the scroll and papyrus of earlier centuries”. But in her claustrophobic community during Northern Ireland’s Troubles, it marks her out as a threat. Even her best friend sees her habit as “disturbing”, “deviant” and “not public-spirited”. The narrator is confused. “Are you saying it’s okay for him to go around with Semtex but not okay for me to read Jane Eyre in public?” Continue reading...

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    The Flat House review – a home made from hemp that will blow your mind

    Practice Architecture’s house is built from the plant growing in the fields around it. The project addresses a vital issue – the energy consumed and carbon emitted during construction Here’s today’s fun fact: the word “canvas” is derived from “cannabis”. (And imagine if the two words had still been identical this past century or so: literature would speak of cannabis-covered deck shoes, of boy scouts enjoying their life under cannabis, of going cannabissing for your parliamentary candidate.) There is a simple reason for this etymology. Among the many uses of hemp, the plant from which the drug comes – uses that include ropes, clothes, food and medicine – was the fabric for the sails of ships. Once commonplace and useful, and hailed in the 1930s as a “billion-dollar crop”, hemp’s modern promise was cut short by its association with narcotics, which led its production to be taxed and outlawed across the western world. Call it paranoia, call it realism, but there’s a theory that billionaires with interests in plastics and paper pulp successfully lobbied the US government to have their rival product suppressed. A war on drugs, in this account, was whipped up in order to deepen the public’s dependency on petrochemicals. Continue reading...

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    'Bike not included': Peloton 'wife' in new ad selling gin for Ryan Reynolds

    Actor Monica Ruiz appears in tongue-in-cheek video ad for Aviation American Gin ‘Peloton husband’ misses the whole point An actor who appeared in a widely criticized Christmas ad for the exercise bike maker Peloton has a new role – selling gin for the actor Ryan Reynolds. The tongue-in-cheek video ad for Aviation American Gin, tweeted by Reynolds on Friday, racked up more than 4m views in its first day online. Continue reading...

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    Liverpool go 11 points clear as Mohamed Salah seals win over Bournemouth

    Jürgen Klopp’s devastating Liverpool machine chewed up and spat out another innocent opponent as his side moved 11 points clear at the Premier League summit and guaranteed they will be top on Christmas Day. An irresistible performance by a reinvigorated and supercharged Mohamed Salah provided the inspiration as Liverpool extended their unbeaten league record to 33 games. Naby Keïta doubled their advantage following a cool Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain opener, becoming the 16th different Liverpool player to find the net in the league this season, before Salah completed the scoring as they swept aside Bournemouth. After giving Salah, Jordan Henderson and Roberto Firmino a breather against Everton in midweek, this time Klopp left Sadio Mané and Trent Alexander-Arnold on the bench, though the latter replaced the injured Dejan Lovren five minutes before half-time, by which point Liverpool had established a two-goal cushion after Bournemouth unravelled. Klopp, with one eye on Tuesday’s crucial match against RB Salzburg – when they must avoid defeat to guarantee qualification to the Champions League knockout stages – again rotated and made seven changes but they dispatched Bournemouth with such ease that he was able to hand the teenager Curtis Jones his league debut. Continue reading...

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    Hobnails, drill and boot camp: secrets of Sam Mendes’s war epic 1917

    Director tells how getting every detail right was crucial to helping his cast understand emotions of war Wasted youth, random violent death and the folly of armed conflict are the big themes of 1917, Sam Mendes’s orchestral symphony of a first world war film. But for the director and the team who made it alongside him, no detail was too small to consider. “It was very important, the question of historical accuracy,” said Mendes. “We had two very fine historical advisers, Andy Robertshaw and Peter Barton, who are world renowned. And one military adviser, Paul Biddiss, who was also brilliant.” Continue reading...

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    ‘I will die if I have to’: hunger striker leads fight against rape crisis in India

    Government inaction drives Swati Maliwal of Delhi Women’s Commission to take a stand “Stop rape. Stop rape.” The chants rang out over the Samta Sthal memorial as hundreds of women from Delhi and beyond raised their fists in a show of collective rage. Among them sat Leena, 35. “I was six years old when I was raped and I could never speak about it,” she said. “This is India’s worst disease and we need to fix it before even more women are hurt.” The outrage that engulfed India last week began with a brutal rape case in Hyderabad, where a 27-year-old vet was gang-raped by four men on her way home from work and then killed, her body burned in a motorway underpass. But each day since, horrific cases have emerged relentlessly, from a teenager in Bihar who was gang-raped, strangled to death and burned, to a six-year-old in Rajasthan who was raped and killed by a neighbour, and a rape victim in Uttar Pradesh who was set upon and burned alive by her rapists, who were out on bail, on her way to testify against them in court. Doctors said on Saturday that the woman had died of her injuries. Continue reading...

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    Rebellious streak: stars embrace two-tone hair in nostalgic throwback

    Fans and celebrity stylists join a growing craze for contrasting 1990s-style strandsForget sun-kissed highlights, the natural look and paying a lot of money to look as though you haven’t been to the hairdresser. The new look, say trendsetters, is dyeing your hair two different colours and wearing the so-called rebellious streak with pride. Think Geri Halliwell in the 1990s, Christina Aguilera in the early 2000s and now, with rather more fashion cred, pop stars Dua Lipa and Billie Eilish. “This trend is totally coming back,” says the celebrity hairdresser Charlie Le Mindu. “I’m seeing it a lot. I do Alice (Glass, former lead singer) from Crystal Castles’ hair and she has this style. It’s pop, but in a grunge punk way.” Continue reading...

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    Sorry, but I’ve lost my faith in tech evangelism

    There are too many worrying developments in tech – traumatised moderators, AI bias, facial recognition – to be anything but pessimistic about the futureFor my sins, I get invited to give a few public lectures every year. Mostly, the topic on which I’m asked to speak is the implications for democracy of digital technology as it has been exploited by a number of giant US corporations. My general argument is that those implications are not good, and I try to explain why I think this is the case. When I’ve finished, there is usually some polite applause before the Q&A begins. And always one particular question comes up. “Why are you so pessimistic?” The interesting thing about that is the way it reveals as much about the questioner as it does about the lecturer. All I have done in my talk, after all, is to lay out the grounds for concern about what networked technology is doing to our democracies. Mostly, my audiences recognise those grounds as genuine – indeed as things about which they themselves have been fretting. So if someone regards a critical examination of these issues as “pessimistic” then it suggests that they have subconsciously imbibed the positive narrative of tech evangelism. Continue reading...

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    Dreaming of a green Christmas: make your own sustainable tree

    Upcycled bike wheels, shredded magazines and papier-mâché baubles… We challenged three eco-minded creators to design a festive tree – with spectacular results Sustainability and seasonality are two guiding principles in the work of Kent-based stylist Hannah Bullivant. “I don’t want to create pretty things that then end up in landfill. I don’t want to add to that problem,” she explains. Her work – which encompasses event styling, creative workshops and interior styling projects – wholeheartedly embraces the storied and the secondhand. So, when asked to create a sustainable tree, she immediately headed outside. Continue reading...

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    Defiant Caroline Wozniacki will end turbulent career with head held high

    After years of burnouts and comebacks, the former world No 1 has seized the chance to leave joyfully on her own termsUntil as recently as two years ago, one of the defining moments of Caroline Wozniacki’s career was the one she spent years trying to forget. Wozniacki was ranked No 1 when she stared down Li Na in the semi-final of the Australian Open in 2011 and it had all the makings of a typical Wozniacki win: she chased down every last ball and gave nothing away, flitting to within a point of her second grand slam final at 20 years old. On match point Wozniacki changed nothing, but across the net adrenaline coursed through Li’s veins as she made her last stand. She stepped inside the court and seized the moment, bulldozing a down‑the-line forehand winner to scupper her opponent before turning the match around in three sets. Continue reading...

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    Omani student among three dead in London stabbings in 12 hours

    Mohammed bin Abdullah Al Araimi, 26, was attacked in Knightsbridge An Omani student has been named as one of three young men killed in a series of unrelated stabbings in London in a little over 12 hours. Mohammed bin Abdullah Al Araimi, 26, was stabbed in a suspected robbery near Harrods in Knightsbridge, west London, as he and a friend made their way home from a nearby restaurant late on Thursday evening. Continue reading...

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    Andy Ruiz Jr's plan to make Anthony Joshua's height work against him

    The Mexican-American giant-killer, who cut his teeth fighting bigger opponents, says the Briton’s style is perfect for him The superficial differences in the physiques of Andy Ruiz Jr and Anthony Joshua were laid bare even more dramatically than six months ago at Friday’s weigh-in on a sun-splashed afternoon outside the Al Faisaliyah Centre in downtown Riyadh. The doughy Ruiz came in at 20st 3lb (283lb) for Saturday’s rematch, more than a stone above the svelte-for-him 268lb of their encounter in June, while the slimmed-down yet still-sculpted Joshua weighed 16st 3lb (237lb), down 10 pounds from the worst night of his boxing life. Continue reading...